Commercial Litigation UK

  • May 01, 2024

    Boris Becker Gets UK Bankruptcy Order Lifted

    Boris Becker is no longer bankrupt after a London court released the multiple Grand Slam tennis champion on Wednesday from any further liability arising from his bankruptcy debt in the U.K.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy VP Says CEO Lynch Told Him To Lie To Investors

    A former Autonomy business development executive testified Tuesday that CEO Mike Lynch directed him to lie to a hedge fund investor about prepaid royalty deals that boosted the company's upfront revenue numbers, saying at Lynch's criminal fraud trial that it was hard to say no to the "big boss."

  • April 30, 2024

    Cartwright King Warned Post Office Of Giving Defense Ammo

    A Cartwright King lawyer warned that the Post Office announcing an independent review into the IT system used to wrongfully prosecute innocent people would "give ammunition" to the defense, according to documents disclosed to the inquiry into the scandal Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    HSF's Paula Hodges On Arbitration's Future — And Her Own

    Herbert Smith Freehills LLP announced earlier this month that Paula Hodges KC will retire from the firm as of Wednesday, with Simon Chapman KC and Andrew Cannon taking her place as co-heads of the global arbitration practice. Law360 recently sat down with Hodges, who spent her entire 37-year career at Herbert Smith Freehills, to talk about what's next, how commercial arbitration has evolved over her career, and her experience as one of the first women in international arbitration.

  • April 30, 2024

    Oil Co. Claims Nigeria In For Windfall From $11B Win Legal Bill

    An oil and gas company urged a London appellate court on Tuesday to change the currency for Nigeria's legal costs from a battle over an $11 billion arbitration award due to bribery and fraud, arguing the West African state would profit from exchange rate fluctuations.

  • April 30, 2024

    Care Home To Pay £63K After Forcing Whistleblower Out

    An employment tribunal has ordered a children's care company to pay £63,400 ($80,000) to a deputy head, after it punished him for raising concerns about the separation of three siblings and subsequently forced him to resign.

  • April 30, 2024

    Office Administrator Who Was Forced To Resign Wins £6K

    An office administrator for a rural women's association in north England has won over £6,000 ($7,520) in a case accusing the association of unlawfully pushing her out when her relationship with the committee chair broke down.

  • April 30, 2024

    Payment Co. Hits Back Over Failed Domain Name Deal

    Several payments companies and their bosses have hit back at claims by a Nuvei Group subsidiary, denying that they broke a promise to use the company's payments technology as part of a deal to use a website domain.

  • April 30, 2024

    Rival Denies Using IBM Software Secrets At London Trial

    Tech company LZLABS denied allegations that it reverse-engineered proprietary technology owned by IBM, telling a London judge Tuesday that its software was not developed using any inner workings or hidden secrets of IBM programs.

  • April 30, 2024

    Tesco Sues Truckmaker Over Emissions Price Fixing Cartel

    Supermarket giant Tesco is seeking damages from Scania after the Swedish truck manufacturer was fined by the European Commission over its role in a price-fixing cartel, according to a claim filed with the U.K.'s antitrust court Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    NHS Wrongly Blocked Whistleblowing Staffer From Working

    A National Health Service trust wrongly stopped an employee from returning to work following a sickness absence after he blew the whistle on patient health risks amid concerns over which medicines his colleagues were prescribing, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-DWF Barrister Disbarred Over False Discrimination Claims

    A tribunal disbarred a formed DWF barrister on Tuesday after concluding that he had dishonestly targeted his boss with false allegations of homophobia and racism, possibly to deflect attention from complaints of misconduct made against him.

  • April 30, 2024

    Eatery Can't Extend 'Physical Damage' Policy To COVID Claim

    An appellate court threw out on Tuesday a restaurant owner's attempt to broaden the scope of a business interruption policy lacking any "nondamage" extensions to include losses sustained during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 30, 2024

    Vanquis Bank Seeks £4.5M For Law Firm's Complaints Deluge

    Vanquis Bank Ltd. is seeking an estimated £4.5 million ($5.6 million) from a law firm it says has sent it thousands of meritless complaints, accusing it of irresponsible lending in a "reckless and indiscriminate" approach to earn commission if a claim happens to succeed.

  • April 30, 2024

    FIFA Player Transfer Rules Could Break EU Antitrust Laws

    FIFA's transfer rules that entitle football clubs to compensation from players and their new clubs when they cut their contract short to switch teams could be unlawful under European Union antitrust laws, an adviser to the bloc's top court said on Tuesday.

  • April 29, 2024

    'I Don't Want To Try That Case,' Judge Tells Mike Lynch's Atty

    The California federal judge overseeing Autonomy founder Michael Lynch's fraud trial over claims he duped HP into paying an inflated $11.7 billion for his company pushed back Monday against an attempt by Lynch's lawyer to introduce evidence of events that took place after the acquisition, saying, "I don't want to try that case."

  • April 29, 2024

    Regulator To Pay £58K For Harassing Gender Critical Worker

    An employment tribunal ordered Westminster City Council and Social Work England to pay £58,344 ($73,284) to a suspended social worker they accused of posting antitransgender content online.

  • April 29, 2024

    Meta Can't Appeal Approval Of £2.3B Data Class Action

    Meta was blocked on Monday from challenging a decision by the Competition Appeal Tribunal to allow a £2.3 billion ($2.8 billion) class action accusing the Facebook owner of exploiting its users' data, after the court found the appeal had "no real prospect of success."

  • April 29, 2024

    Butlins Sues Insurers For £60M After Flood Damage

    A major holiday resort is suing a number of its insurers, including Aviva and QBE, for failing to pay out on losses sustained when a vacation park was flooded, causing the closure of many of its lodges.

  • April 29, 2024

    DWF Barrister Made False Discrimination Claims, BSB Says

    A former DWF LLP barrister is facing disciplinary action over allegations that he dishonestly and deliberately targeted his boss with false accusations of homophobia and racism.

  • April 29, 2024

    IBM Targets Rival For Reverse Engineering Code At Trial

    Computer giant IBM accused European rival LzLabs at the beginning of a nine-week trial Monday of violating its consumer agreement, saying the competitor's "reverse engineering" of some of its software is a breach of contract.

  • April 30, 2024

    CORRECTED: Marketing Boss Said LC&F Was A Legitimate Biz, Not A 'Rinse'

    The head of a marketing company who referred to London Capital & Finance as a "not a rinse" insisted he was not aware of an alleged Ponzi scheme as he gave evidence on Monday at the trial over the £237 million ($296 million) investment scandal. Correction: An earlier version of the story misstated the content of Careless' 2015 email exchange. The error has been corrected.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ex-Man City Player Benjamin Mendy Pays £710K Tax Debt

    Former Manchester City footballer Benjamin Mendy avoided bankruptcy on Monday after paying a £710,000 ($892,000) tax bill minutes before a court hearing to determine whether an order should be made.

  • April 29, 2024

    Nurse's Slave Trade Comment Claim Too Late, Tribunal Rules

    An employment tribunal has ruled that a clinical manager at a London hospice left it too late to bring a race harassment claim alleging a hospice doctor asked her why slaves were taken to America instead of England.

  • April 29, 2024

    BHP Offers $26B To Settle Brazil Dam Disaster Claims

    BHP's Brazilian subsidiary and its partners in a failed mine operation offered $25.7 billion in reparations on Monday for a 2015 environmental disaster in Brazil that killed 19 people, triggering one of the largest group claims in English legal history. 

Expert Analysis

  • Extradition Ruling Hints At Ways Around High Burden Of Proof

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    The U.K. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Popoviciu v. Curtea De Apel Bucharest confirmed that, in a conviction extradition case, the requested person must establish a flagrant violation of their right to a fair trial, but the court's reasoning reveals creative opportunities to test this boundary in the U.K. and Strasbourg alike, says Rebecca Hughes at Corker Binning.

  • IP Ruling Could Pave Way For AI Patents In UK

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    If implemented by the U.K. Intellectual Property Office, the High Court's recent ruling in Emotional Perception AI v. Comptroller-General of Patents, holding that artificial neural networks can be patented, could be a first step to welcoming AI patents in the U.K., say Arnie Francis and Alexandra Brodie at Gowling.

  • UK Review May Lead To Lower Investment Screening Burden

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    The government’s current review of national security investment screening rules aims to refine the scope of mandatory notifications required for unproblematic deals, and is likely to result in much-needed modifications to minimize the administrative burden on businesses and investors, say lawyers at Simpson Thacher.

  • What Prince Harry Privacy Case May Mean For Media Ethics

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    An English High Court recently allowed the privacy case brought by Prince Harry and six other claimants against the Daily Mail publisher to proceed, which, if successful, could embolden other high-profile individuals to bring claims and lead to renewed calls for a judicial public inquiry into British press ethics, says Philippa Dempster at Freeths.

  • How European Authorities Are Foiling Anti-Competitive Hiring

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    Lawyers at Squire Patton discuss key labor practice antitrust concerns and notable regulation trends in several European countries following recent enforcement actions brought by the European Commission and U.K. Competition and Markets Authority.

  • When Can Bonuses Be Clawed Back?

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    The High Court's recent decision in Steel v. Spencer should remind employees that the contractual conditions surrounding bonuses and the timing of any resignation must be carefully considered, as in certain circumstances, bonuses can and are being successfully clawed back by employers, say Merrill April and Rachael Parker at CM Murray.

  • The State Of UK Litigation Funding After Therium Ruling

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    The recent English High Court decision in Therium v. Bugsby Property has provided a glimmer of hope for litigation funders about how courts will interpret this summer's U.K. Supreme Court ruling that called funding agreements impermissible, suggesting that its adverse effects may be mitigated, says Daniel Williams at DWF Law.

  • Trial By AI Could Be Closer Than You Think

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    In a known first for the U.K., a Court of Appeal justice recently admitted to using ChatGPT to write part of a judgment, highlighting how AI could make the legal system more efficient and enable the judicial process to record more accurate and fair decisions, say Charles Kuhn and Neide Lemos at Clyde & Co.

  • Why It's Urgent For Pharma Cos. To Halt Counterfeit Meds

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    With over 10.5 million counterfeit medicines seized in the EU in 2023, it is vital both ethically and commercially that pharmaceutical companies take steps to protect against such infringements, including by invoking intellectual property rights protection, says Lars Karnøe at Potter Clarkson.

  • Nix Of $11B Award Shows Limits Of Arbitral Process

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    A recent English High Court decision in Nigeria v. Process & Industrial Developments, overturning an arbitration award because it was obtained by fraud, is a reminder that arbitration decisions are ultimately still accountable to the courts, and that the relative simplicity of the arbitration rules is not necessarily always a benefit, say Robin Henry and Abbie Coleman at Collyer Bristow.

  • How The Netherlands Became A Hub For EU Class Actions

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    As countries continue to implement the European Union Collective Redress Directive, the Netherlands — the country with the largest class action docket in the EU — provides a real-world example of what class and mass litigation may eventually look like in the bloc, say lawyers at Faegre Drinker and Houthoff.

  • Navigating The Novel Challenges Facing The Legal Profession

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    The increasing prominence of ESG and AI have transformed the legal landscape and represent new opportunities for lawyers, but with evolving regulations and the ever-expanding reach of the Solicitors Regulation Authority, law firms should ensure that they have appropriate policies in place to adapt to these challenges, say Scott Ashby and Aimee Talbot at RPC.

  • New Fixed Costs Rules May Have Unforeseen Consequences

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    The recent changes to fixed recoverable costs, which were intended to reduce costs and increase certainty, have profound implications for civil claims, but may unintentionally prompt more litigation and reduce access to justice as lawyers leave the market, says Paul Squires at Sedgwick Legal.

  • A Look At Enforcing And Contesting Arbitral Awards In Qatar

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    As Qatar aspires to become a regional investment hub as part of its Qatar Vision 2030, it has committed to modernizing its arbitration practices in accordance with international standards, including updating the process of enforcing and contesting arbitration awards, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Deal Over Jets Stranded In Russia May Serve As Blueprint

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    In the face of a pending "mega-trial" over leased airplanes held in Russia after its invasion of Ukraine, a settlement between leading aviation lessor AerCap Holdings NV and NSK, the Russian state-controlled insurance company, could pave the way for similar deals, say Samantha Zaozirny and Timeyin Pinnick at Browne Jacobson.

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