Commercial Contracts

  • May 21, 2024

    LoanDepot's $3.5M Deal In IPO Disclosure Suit Gets Final OK

    A California federal judge has granted final approval to LoanDepot's $3.5 million settlement in a suit alleging it misled investors leading up to the company's initial public offering, despite a shareholder's objection that the settlement is insufficient.

  • May 21, 2024

    Eye Drops Must Sell On Even Terms Under Rare Antitrust Win

    A California federal judge cemented a rare win under a little-used antitrust law, following up on a December jury verdict against an eye drops company with a decision barring it from offering Costco better terms than the retail wholesaler plaintiffs.

  • May 21, 2024

    Conn. Bank Hit With Suit Over 'Crippling' Overdraft Fees

    Connecticut-based Ion Bank is the latest financial institution to face a putative class action alleging it violated its agreements with customers by imposing overdraft fees on certain transactions.

  • May 21, 2024

    X Corp., Hate Speech Watchdog Settle Atty Fees Bid

    A California federal judge Tuesday signed off on an agreement that X Corp. and the Center for Countering Digital Hate reached to resolve the nonprofit organization's bid for $300,000 in attorney fees following a successful defense against the Elon Musk-led social media platform's claims that the center used improper tactics to write one of its articles.

  • May 21, 2024

    Texas Court Questions Luxottica On 'Playing Favorites' In Sale

    A Texas appellate court on Tuesday asked whether an eyewear conglomerate was "playing favorites by not disclosing" alleged fraud by its franchisees in a sale of two stores to other franchisees, questioning Luxottica's assertion it had to keep its hands off the transaction.

  • May 21, 2024

    MLB Scouts' Colo. Age Bias Suit Moved To New York

    A Colorado federal judge refused to dismiss an age bias suit brought against Major League Baseball by a group of 40-and-older scouts and instead transferred the case to New York, saying he was using his discretionary authority because most defendants have no ties to his district.

  • May 21, 2024

    Ex-Crypto Co. President Was Deceived And Ousted, Suit Says

    A cryptocurrency entrepreneur has filed a suit in Delaware's Court of Chancery accusing a CEO of making fraudulent misrepresentations to recruit him to serve as president of his blockchain company, then unjustifiably firing him.

  • May 21, 2024

    FSU Asks NC Justices To Favor Fla. Suit In ACC Fee Fight

    The Florida State University board of trustees has asked North Carolina justices to do what the Tar Heel state's Business Court did not and halt the Atlantic Coast Conference's lawsuit over media rights contracts in favor of letting parallel litigation in Florida play out.

  • May 21, 2024

    AT&T Unit Asks High Court To Take Up E-Rate FCA Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court needs to step in and decide a circuit split over whether FCC reimbursements under the E-rate program count as "claims" under the False Claims Act, said an AT&T subsidiary, urging the justices to ignore a relator who it said is trying to "muddy that clear conflict."

  • May 21, 2024

    FTC Chair Khan Says Corporate Concentration Creates Fear

    Federal Trade Commission Chair Lina Khan said Tuesday that corporate concentration creates fear for many Americans, including small businesses that rely on digital gatekeepers like Google and Amazon.

  • May 21, 2024

    Colo. Hotel Denies Directly Hiring H-2B Workers In Wage Suit

    A Colorado luxury hotel told a federal judge that it doesn't belong in a proposed class action accusing it and its cleaning contractor of unlawfully deducting Mexican housekeeping workers' wages, saying the contractor is the workers' sole employer.

  • May 21, 2024

    Ex-LA DA Sues State Farm Over Gun Incident Legal Fees

    Former Los Angeles County District Attorney Jackie Lacey sued her insurer in California state court Tuesday, alleging State Farm cost her more than $2.1 million by failing to cover legal fees when she and her late husband were sued because he brandished a gun against protesters at their home.

  • May 21, 2024

    Split Fed. Circ. Revives IP Suit Against Nokia Over Standing

    A split Federal Circuit on Tuesday threw out a lower court decision that found an inventor's company didn't have standing to sue Nokia, Cisco and ADVA over a fiber optic patent, saying it was unclear if the company had the rights to the patent.

  • May 21, 2024

    Houston Club Asks Court To Halt Storm Damage Demolition

    A Houston nightclub damaged in last week's severe storm told a Harris County court Monday that city officials improperly declared that the building should be demolished.

  • May 21, 2024

    Attys Accused Of Botching NC Suit By Missing Filing Deadline

    The parents of two children who died in a car fire are suing their former attorneys in North Carolina federal court for malpractice, alleging they dropped the ball on filing the pair's wrongful death claims against a seat belt manufacturer before the deadline passed.

  • May 21, 2024

    Bottini & Bottini Gets Atty Fee Suit Sent To Arbitration

    A Texas attorney must arbitrate his $730,000 fee suit against Bottini & Bottini Inc., a federal judge in the Lone Star State has ordered, finding the settlement agreement underlying the lawyer's claims included a binding arbitration clause despite the attorney not personally signing the document.

  • May 21, 2024

    Strategic Hiring Was The New Normal For BigLaw In 2023

    The 400 largest law firms by headcount in the U.S. grew more slowly in 2023 than in the previous two years, while Kirkland & Ellis LLP surpassed the 3,000-attorney threshold, according to the latest Law360 ranking.

  • May 21, 2024

    The Law360 400: Tracking The Largest US Law Firms

    The legal market expanded more tentatively in 2023 than in previous years amid a slowdown in demand for legal services, especially in transactions, an area that has been sluggish but is expected to quicken in the near future.

  • May 20, 2024

    Bungie Takes Aim At Cheat Code Sellers In Copyright Trial

    Video game studio Bungie kicked off a Seattle copyright trial on Monday by telling federal jurors a group of cheat code sellers deleted financial records and other data and even fabricated a fake press release about the sale of their website to throw Bungie and its attorneys off their scent.

  • May 20, 2024

    AMC Can Arbitrate Suit Alleging 'Hannibal' Creator Assault

    A Los Angeles judge on Monday granted AMC's request to arbitrate claims brought by a television producer who says he was sexually assaulted by "Hannibal" creator Bryan Fuller while working on a docuseries for the cable channel and also stayed claims against Fuller and all defendants.

  • May 20, 2024

    Justices Turn Away Hospital Construction Feud

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a case that centers on a $180 million project to expand a Mississippi children's hospital, once again declining to resolve whether parties that agree to certain arbitral rules have also agreed to delegate jurisdictional questions to the arbitrator.

  • May 20, 2024

    TD Bank Ex-Employees Ordered To Back Off Client Contacts

    TD Bank NA and its subsidiary TD Private Client Wealth LLC scored a temporary restraining order in Connecticut federal court in a suit accusing two former employees of breaking nonsolicitation agreements and enticing $25 million in client assets to move with them to Raymond James Financial Services Inc.

  • May 20, 2024

    TD Bank Customers' $32.2M Overdraft Fee Deal Gets Initial OK

    A New Jersey federal judge has given the first green light to a nearly $22 million settlement, plus more than $10 million in overdraft forgiveness, in a suit alleging TD Bank charged improper overdraft fees in debit card transactions.

  • May 20, 2024

    Idaho, Micron Defend 'Bad Faith' Patent Law At Fed. Circ.

    The state of Idaho and Micron Technology Inc. have told the Federal Circuit that Idaho's law barring "bad faith" allegations of patent infringement is constitutional, defending a lower court's ruling that Longhorn IP must pay an $8 million bond under the law.

  • May 20, 2024

    Startup Admits Sharing IP With Boeing After Supposed Swipe

    The co-founder of a startup accusing the Boeing Co. of plotting to steal its intellectual property to build a copycat electric jet acknowledged during cross-examination Monday that his company kept willingly sharing trade secrets with the aviation giant after discovering the alleged misappropriations.

Expert Analysis

  • Del. Rulings Make Clear That 'Arbitrator' Isn't A Magic Word

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    Recent decisions by the Delaware Chancery Court clarify that calling a process an "expert determination" or "arbitration" in a purchase agreement is not sufficient to define it as such, so practitioners must consider how to structure dispute resolution provisions to achieve their clients’ desired result, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Protecting IP May Be Tricky Without Noncompetes

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    Contrary to the Federal Trade Commission's view, trade secret law cannot replace noncompetes' protection of proprietary information because intellectual property includes far more than just trade secrets, so businesses need to closely examine their IP protection options, say Aimee Fagan and Ching-Lee Fukuda at Sidley.

  • A Look At FERC's Plan To End Reactive Power Compensation

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    A recent notice of proposed rulemaking indicates that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is likely to eliminate compensation for reactive power within the standard power factor range — causing significant impacts for the electric power industry, which relies on income from providing this service, say Norman Bay and Matthew Goldberg at Willkie and Vivian Chum at Wright & Talisman.

  • 8 Legal Issues Influencing Investors In The Creator Economy

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    The rapidly expanding digital creator economy — funding for which more than doubled in the U.S. in the first quarter — comes with its own set of unique legal issues investors must carefully consider before diving in, say Louis Lehot and Alan Pate at Foley & Lardner.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

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    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • IP Considerations For Companies In Carbon Capture Sector

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    As companies collaborate to commercialize carbon capture technologies amid massive government investment under the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, a coherent intellectual property strategy is more important than ever, including proactively addressing and resolving questions about ownership of the technology, say Ashley Kennedy and James De Vellis at Foley & Lardner.

  • What's Notable In JAMS' New Mass Arbitration Rules

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    The Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services’ recently released guidelines, coming on the heels of similar American Arbitration Association amendments, suggests that mass arbitrations will remain an efficient means for consumers to vindicate their rights against companies, say Jonathan Waisnor and Brandon Heitmann at Labaton Keller. 

  • How New Rule Would Change CFIUS Enforcement Powers

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    Before the May 15 comment deadline, companies may want to weigh in on proposed regulatory changes to enforcement and mitigation tools at the disposal of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, including broadened subpoena powers, difficult new mitigation timelines and higher maximum penalties, say attorneys at Venable.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • Breaking Down 4th Circ. Pendent Appellate Jurisdiction Ruling

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    As illustrated by the Fourth Circuit's recent decision in Elegant Massage v. State Farm, denying class certification and granting a motion to dismiss, federal appellate courts continue to struggle with defining the scope of pendent appellate jurisdiction — or jurisdiction over nonfinal orders below, says Joan Steinman at the Chicago-Kent College of Law.

  • FTC Noncompete Rule May Still Face Historical Hurdles

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    The Federal Trade Commission's final rule banning noncompetes might face challenges that could have been avoided with more cautious consideration of the commission's long history of failed lawsuits that went beyond the agency's statutory authority, as well as the mountain of judicial precedent justifying noncompete agreements in employment contracts, say attorneys at BakerHostetler.

  • Microplastics At The Crossroads Of Regulation And Litigation

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    Though there are currently not many federal regulations specifically addressing microplastics as pollutants, regulatory scrutiny and lawsuits asserting consumer protection claims are both on the rise, and manufacturers should take proactive steps to implement preventive measures accordingly, say Aliza Karetnick and Franco Corrado at Morgan Lewis.

  • How EB-5 Regional Centers Can Prepare For USCIS Audits

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    In response to the recently announced U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services guidelines that require EB-5 regional center audits every five years to verify their compliance with immigration and securities laws, regional centers should take steps to facilitate a seamless audit process, say Jennifer Hermansky and Miriam Thompson at Greenberg Traurig.

  • As Arbitrator Bias Claims Rise, Disclosure Standards Evolve

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    The growth in post-award challenges based on arbitrators' alleged conflicts of interest has led to the release of new guidance and new case law on the topic — both supporting the view that professional familiarity alone does not translate to a lack of impartiality, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • How Cos. Can Protect IP In Light Of FTC Noncompete Rule

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    While several groups are challenging the Federal Trade Commission’s recently approved rule banning noncompetition agreements, employers should begin planning other ways to protect their valuable trade secrets, confidential information and other intellectual property, says Thomas Duston at Marshall Gerstein.

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