Connecticut

  • May 02, 2024

    Split Conn. Supreme Court Says No To 'Ratio' Utility Bills

    In a rare 4-3 opinion, the Connecticut Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that a corporate landlord cannot use a ratio utility billing system to divide monthly costs among units not equipped with precise individual meters, stressing a legislative policy of protecting tenants from fluctuating fees beyond their immediate control.

  • May 01, 2024

    Split 2nd Circ. Backs Arbitration Denial In ERISA Suit

    A divided Second Circuit panel ruled Wednesday that a group of financial services companies can't compel individual arbitration of a proposed class action accusing them of overcharging an employee stock ownership plan, saying that doing so would prevent a plan participant from seeking planwide remedies authorized by federal benefits law.

  • May 01, 2024

    Oil Drilling Workers Urge High Court Not To Review PPE Suit

    The Third Circuit's view that time putting on and taking off personal protective equipment becomes compensable if the gear is integral and indispensable to employees' work actually aligns with a Second Circuit's standard, oil rig workers told the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday.

  • May 01, 2024

    53 Govs. Want Say In Moving Nat'l Guard Staff To Space Force

    The governors of 48 states and several U.S. territories warned the U.S. Department of Defense that allowing hundreds of Air National Guard personnel to be transferred to the U.S. Space Force without the governors' approval undermines their authority over their states' military readiness.

  • May 01, 2024

    Metal Biz Owner Cops To Tax Fraud On $2.8M Income

    The owner of a metal fabrication company admitted to neglecting to report nearly $3 million in business income to the IRS, Connecticut federal prosecutors announced.

  • May 01, 2024

    Conn. Attorney Scores Default $85K Win In Legal Bill Feud

    A federal judge has ordered two Colorado companies, one of which claimed to be working on a cryptocurrency exchange, to pay a default judgment of $85,456 after failing to answer a Connecticut firm's claims that they failed to pay nearly $107,000 in legal fees.

  • May 01, 2024

    More Withdraw From Conn. Atty Hacked Payment Lawsuits

    A series of withdrawals has cut into a voluminous pile of lawsuits surrounding a real estate attorney's wiring of money to the wrong people in connection with several real estate sales, with First American Title among the parties that filed recent withdrawal notices in the myriad matters.

  • May 01, 2024

    NBA Vet Eyes Bail As Healthcare Rap Passed To 2nd Circ.

    A former Detroit Pistons point guard is seeking to delay the start of his 18-month prison sentence for his alleged role in a scheme to defraud the NBA's healthcare plan while he argues to the Second Circuit that improper jury instructions tainted his trial.

  • May 01, 2024

    Textron Aviation Must Face Questions In Conn. Death Suits

    A Connecticut state court judge says a Kansas-based aircraft manufacturer must answer a series of questions about its connections to the Constitution State after being sued over a 2021 plane crash, disagreeing with most of Textron Aviation Inc.'s personal jurisdiction arguments that it need not face additional interrogatories.

  • May 01, 2024

    Feds Say Conn. Psychologist's Fraud Was His 'Way Of Life'

    A Connecticut psychologist who pled guilty to defrauding his state's Medicaid program of $1.6 million in January should spend three years and one month in prison for a scheme that was "a way of life" rather than a momentary lapse in judgment, the government said in a sentencing memorandum.

  • April 30, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Commerzbank RMBS Suit Against US Bank

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday revived part of a nearly decade-old Commerzbank AG lawsuit brought against U.S. Bank NA over its role as a trustee on a slew of pre-2008 crisis RMBS trusts, sending some of the German bank's previously dismissed claims back to district court for a "closer inspection."

  • April 30, 2024

    Aetna Resists State Court Remand In Provider Payment Suit

    A lawsuit alleging Aetna units have underpaid emergency healthcare workers' benefit claims should be heard in an Ohio federal court, the insurer said in opposing a remand to the state level, based in part on the argument that two of the corporate defendants don't belong in the case.

  • April 30, 2024

    Judge Seeks Promises From Adviser, Wife In $5.9M SEC Case

    A federal judge in Connecticut said Tuesday that he planned to at least temporarily deny a request from an investment adviser and his wife to release $50,000 from purported personal accounts to pay attorneys after the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission accused the adviser of wrongly pocketing $5.9 million from clients.

  • April 30, 2024

    Conn. Mortgage Co. Settles Data Breach Claims

    A mortgage company settled a consolidated data breach class action that accused the company in Connecticut federal court of being liable for a November 2023 data breach that compromised its customers' personal information.

  • April 30, 2024

    Conn. Atty Says Depo Reveals Referral Fee Deal Was Legit

    An attorney who says another lawyer owes him a $58,333 referral fee for handing over a personal injury case has pointed to a deposition to argue that referral "discussions" occurred despite his opponent's apparent claims that they didn't, according to a supplemental argument submitted to a Connecticut state trial court judge.

  • April 30, 2024

    Conn. Firm Settles Copyright Feuds Over Website Photos

    The Connecticut consumer law firm Lemberg Law LLC and its managing attorney have agreed to settle two suits tied to a multistate copyright battle with a stock photo provider that arose in 2020 after the firm was accused of using images on its website without permission, and then countered that it was the victim of an extortion attempt.

  • April 30, 2024

    Sens. Want Clarity On Foreign College Athletes' NIL Rights

    Lawmakers on Monday pressed the Biden administration for guidance on the ability of foreign-born college athletes to earn money through advertisements and publicity deals, stressing that imprecise visa rules have confused the athletes.

  • April 29, 2024

    Boehringer Accused Of Monopolizing Inhaler Product Market

    Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals has manipulated the U.S. patent and drug approval system to unlawfully block makers of generic inhaler medications, health and welfare funds claimed in a lawsuit filed Monday in Connecticut federal court, arguing that the "availability of generics has tangible cost and life-saving effects."

  • April 29, 2024

    DCG Gets To Face Combined Crypto Actions In Conn.

    Cryptocurrency venture capital company Digital Currency Group Inc. has won its bid to move an investor action from Manhattan to Connecticut, where it faces similar claims over alleged losses during the so-called "crypto winter."

  • April 29, 2024

    Biz Groups Fight Conn. Ban On 'Captive Audience' Meetings

    A Connecticut law that lets workers skip employers' meetings to discuss unionization violates employers' right to free speech, a coalition of business groups argued in Connecticut federal court, seeking a pretrial win on allegations that the law violates the U.S. Constitution and federal labor law.

  • April 29, 2024

    Amtrak Wants Out Of Black Conductor's Bias Suit

    Amtrak is urging a Connecticut federal judge to let it out of a Black conductor's lawsuit alleging she was passed over for union committee assignments in favor of less experienced white men and harassed by a superior after she complained, saying her gripes should be directed solely at the union.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    Connecticut Quarry Crushed By Politics Gets Extra $1.2M

    The town of East Haven, Connecticut, and two former officials must pay an additional $1.2 million to a rock quarry that was forced to shutter due a purported political maneuver ahead of the 2017 mayoral race, on top of an existing award of $9.46 million in damages for lost profits, a federal judge has ruled.

  • April 29, 2024

    Conn. Health Co., Competitor Eye Deal In Trade Secrets Suit

    Connecticut-based healthcare marketing firm Primacy LLC and a direct competitor accused of poaching top executive Matt Cyr are looking to settle a trade secrets lawsuit by pausing a preliminary injunction hearing and engaging a new magistrate judge to help them work out their differences.

  • April 29, 2024

    Connecticut Firm Seeks $500K Fee In Magnesium Class Action

    A Connecticut law firm has asked a New Jersey federal judge to approve its request for $500,000 in attorney fees and expenses for its representation in a class action over a company's allegedly deceptive advertising of a magnesium supplement.

Expert Analysis

  • 4 Steps To Navigating Employee Dementia With Care

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    A recent Connecticut suit brought by an employee terminated after her managers could not reasonably accommodate her Alzheimer's-related dementia should prompt employers to plan how they can compassionately address older employees whose cognitive impairments affect their job performance, while also protecting the company from potential disability and age discrimination claims, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • Navigating New Regulations In Healthcare And Other M&A

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    While notice requirements recently enacted in several states are focused on the healthcare industry for now, this trend could extend to other industries as these requirements are designed to allow regulators to be a step ahead and learn more about a transaction long before it occurs, say Kathleen Premo and Ashley Creech at Epstein Becker.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Ex-OpenSea Staffer Case May Clarify When Info Is Property

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    In considering the appeal of a former OpenSea manager’s wire fraud conviction in U.S. v. Chastain, the Second Circuit may soon provide guidance about whether economic information is traditional property in certain insider trading prosecutions — a theory of fraud that the U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly narrowed, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

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