Labor

  • May 01, 2024

    NLRB Judge Seeks Cause In Starbucks, Union Postpone Bid

    A National Labor Relations Board judge asked agency prosecutors Wednesday to show cause related to a request from Starbucks and Workers United to postpone hearing dates this month over refusal to bargain claims, while the parties mention ongoing talks to settle board litigation.

  • May 01, 2024

    SpaceX Again Asks 5th Circ. To Step Into NLRB Challenge

    SpaceX called on the Fifth Circuit Wednesday to freeze a National Labor Relations Board hearing scheduled for Thursday afternoon, saying in its second trip to the appeals court that it will suffer irreparable harm if the administrative suit proceeds before the agency it claims is unconstitutional.

  • May 01, 2024

    Amazon Says Worker Info Requests Threaten Its Legal Rights

    Amazon asked a New York federal judge to reject requests for information about its Staten Island facility workers in a dispute over leadership of the Amazon Labor Union, calling them "an improper collateral attack" on its ability to contest the results of the union's election win.

  • May 01, 2024

    UAW Local Calls Arrests Of Members At USC Protest Illegal

    The University of Southern California violated federal labor law by having union members who protested in support of a ceasefire in Gaza arrested, a United Auto Workers affiliate representing graduate student workers said.

  • May 01, 2024

    Acting Labor Sec. Defends Status, Rules At Tense Hearing

    Acting Labor Secretary Julie Su defended her U.S. Department of Labor role and recent agency rules at a U.S. House committee hearing on Wednesday from Republicans who accused her of serving through a "loophole" and who questioned the legality of actions under her leadership.

  • May 01, 2024

    NLRB Says Beverage Co. Wrongly Put Union Leader On Leave

    A Puerto Rico beverage distributor violated federal labor law by placing an employee union leader on six months of unpaid leave and prematurely declaring an impasse in bargaining, the National Labor Relations Board ruled, upholding an August decision from an agency judge.

  • April 30, 2024

    NJ AG Asks Court To Nix UAW's Suit Over Smoking In Casinos

    The New Jersey attorney general has requested that a state court dismiss a United Auto Workers complaint claiming a law excluding casino workers from a smoking ban at certain indoor workspaces violates the state constitution, saying the dispute should be left to the Legislature.

  • April 30, 2024

    UAW, Fiat Chrysler Settle Anti-Gay Discrimination Suit

    Fiat Chrysler and a United Auto Workers local have agreed to resolve a former worker's lawsuit alleging she was fired for complaining about anti-gay harassment she faced and her union didn't adequately pursue her grievance, according to a filing in Michigan federal court.

  • April 30, 2024

    Welch's Says Worker Should Stay Fired In Dispute With Union

    Welch Foods Inc. on Tuesday said a Pennsylvania magistrate judge is wrong to say the company should be forced to rehire a Teamsters-represented worker it fired for making vulgar comments to a female co-worker, saying the words the ex-employee used should be construed as sexual harassment.

  • April 30, 2024

    6th Circ. Weighs Merits, Procedure In NLRB Severance Case

    The Sixth Circuit grappled Tuesday with a hospital's challenge to the National Labor Relations Board's ruling that it unlawfully offered severance agreements that muzzled workers, with one judge questioning how the agreements interfered with workers' rights and another whether the hospital was even entitled to oppose the new standard.

  • April 30, 2024

    Google's Challenge To YouTube Music Union Stays In DC Circ.

    The D.C. Circuit will continue adjudicating Google's challenge to the unionization of its subsidiary YouTube Music, rejecting on Tuesday a request by the company and its contractor Cognizant to transfer the case to the Fifth Circuit.

  • April 30, 2024

    SEIU Cites Starbucks Organizing In Push For Cemex Standard

    The Service Employees International Union invoked the nationwide organizing campaign at Starbucks stores in a request for the Ninth Circuit to back a National Labor Relations Board precedent shift for bargaining orders, arguing the new standard will help deter labor law violations.

  • April 30, 2024

    ExxonMobil Tells 5th Circ. Ex-NLRB Member Wasn't Biased

    ExxonMobil asked the Fifth Circuit to overturn a National Labor Relations Board decision finding the oil giant unlawfully refused to bargain with a union, saying the NLRB erred by vacating the company's 2020 win in the case after uncovering a Trump-era board member's financial ties to ExxonMobil.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ex-Officers Seek Early Win Against Flight Attendant Union

    Former officers of the Association of Professional Flight Attendants urged a Texas federal judge to toss claims from the union that they violated their fiduciary duty, accusing the union of raising allegations to further "its political agenda against plaintiffs."

  • April 29, 2024

    NLRB Precedent Shift On Severance Pacts Faces 6th Circ.

    A Sixth Circuit panel is prepared to review a National Labor Relations Board decision that held employers violate federal labor law by offering severance agreements with overly broad confidentiality and nondisparagement clauses, a closely watched argument over a precedent shift that experts said has had major effects on employers.

  • April 29, 2024

    Biz Groups Fight Conn. Ban On 'Captive Audience' Meetings

    A Connecticut law that lets workers skip employers' meetings to discuss unionization violates employers' right to free speech, a coalition of business groups argued in Connecticut federal court, seeking a pretrial win on allegations that the law violates the U.S. Constitution and federal labor law.

  • April 29, 2024

    Amtrak Wants Out Of Black Conductor's Bias Suit

    Amtrak is urging a Connecticut federal judge to let it out of a Black conductor's lawsuit alleging she was passed over for union committee assignments in favor of less experienced white men and harassed by a superior after she complained, saying her gripes should be directed solely at the union.

  • April 29, 2024

    DOL Issues Guidance On Using AI In The Workplace

    The U.S. Department of Labor issued guidance Monday on how employers can carefully use artificial intelligence, saying a lack of human eyes could create a domino effect and lead to violations of federal wage and leave laws.

  • April 29, 2024

    Judge Rejects Class Certification Of Seizure Drug Customers

    An Illinois federal judge has rejected a class certification bid in a suit against drugmaker Mallinckrodt and prescription delivery platform Express Scripts, ruling that the plaintiffs were unable to meet their predominance burden as a class.

  • April 29, 2024

    Calif. Cannabis Labor Law Violates US Constitution, Co. Says

    A California cannabis law's provisions mandating labor peace agreements between dispensaries and unions violate the U.S. Constitution, a cannabis retailer has alleged, saying the statute unlawfully gives the labor organization more leverage when negotiating what requirements are in the accords.

  • April 29, 2024

    Union Didn't Betray Employee Slapped At Work, NLRB Says

    A union steward acted in good faith when suggesting that if a transportation company fired an employee who slapped her co-worker, it should also fire the co-worker for provoking her, a split National Labor Relations Board found, saying the suggestion wasn't a betrayal but a strategy to discourage firings.

  • April 26, 2024

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    In the past year, plaintiffs have won settlements and judgments for millions and billions of dollars from companies such as Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Fox News, with many high-profile cases finally wrapping up after years of fighting. Such cases — involving over-the-top compensation packages, chemical contamination, gender discrimination and data mining — were led by attorneys whose accomplishments earned them recognition as Law360's Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar for 2024.

  • April 26, 2024

    DOL Solidifies H-2A Protections For Foreign Farmworkers

    Foreign farmworkers working in the U.S. under the H-2A temporary visa program will now have enhanced protections to advocate for better working conditions without fear of retaliation under a final U.S. Department of Labor rule unveiled Friday.

  • April 26, 2024

    Starbucks, Union Tout 'Significant Progress' In Contract Talks

    Starbucks and Workers United "made significant progress" in collective bargaining negotiations this past week, the parties announced Friday, with experts telling Law360 that the contract talks are a starting point, but the details of these negotiations remain to be seen.

  • April 26, 2024

    Struggling Amazon Union Hopes To Retool As Election Looms

    Two years after its surprise election win at a Staten Island warehouse, the Amazon Labor Union is broke, beset by infighting and ignored by management. Can new leadership at the onetime darling of the labor movement turn it around?

Expert Analysis

  • Joint Employer Considerations After NLRB's Google Ruling

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    Following the National Labor Relations Board's recent decision that Google is a joint employer of its independent contractor's employees, Matthew Green and Daniel Unterburger at Obermayer Rebmann offer practice tips to help companies preemptively assess the risks and broader implications of the decision to engage contractors.

  • What's Notable In Connecticut's New Cannabis Laws

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    The Connecticut Legislature recently passed four bills containing cannabis provisions — ranging from applicable tax credits to labor agreement requirements — that may prove to be a mixed bag for state operators, say Sarah Westby and Deanna McWeeney at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • Employer Use Of Electronic Monitoring Is Not An OSHA Issue

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    A recent Law360 guest article asserted that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration must begin work on regulating electronic monitoring of employee performance because it can contribute to higher rates of injuries and mental stress, but electronic monitoring simply is not a recognized hazard, says Lawrence Halprin at Keller and Heckman.

  • Takeaways From NLRB's New Workplace Rule Standards

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    Following a recent National Labor Relations Board decision that allows for increased scrutiny of workplace rules, employers will want to analyze whether any policies could reasonably dissuade employees from engaging in concerted activity, as the bar for proving a legitimate business interest has been raised, say attorneys at Taft Stettinius.

  • Water Cooler Talk: 'The Bear' Serves Up Advice For Managers

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Ernst & Young’s Laura Yehuda about Hulu's "The Bear" and the best practices managers can glean from the show's portrayal of workplace challenges, including those faced by young, female managers.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • The Issues Brewing Around Starbucks Labor Practice Cases

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    Starbucks is faced with fighting off another push for a nationwide injunction against firing any employees that support unionization, and there's a distinct possibility that the company and the National Labor Relations Board could be fighting the same fight over and over in various locations, says Janette Levey at Levey Law.

  • Employer Tips For Fighting Back Against Explosive Verdicts

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    Massive jury verdicts are a product of our time, driven in part by reptile tactics, but employers can build a strategic defense to mitigate the risk of a runaway jury, and develop tools to seek judicial relief in the event of an adverse outcome, say Dawn Solowey and Lynn Kappelman at Seyfarth.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Changing Status Quo In A Union Shop

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    A recent administrative law decision concerning a dispute between Fortune Media and the NewsGuild of New York is an important reminder to employers with unionized workforces to refrain from making unilateral updates to employee handbooks that will change the terms and conditions of employment, says Jennifer Hataway at Butler Snow.

  • Eye On Compliance: A Shift In Religious Accommodation Law

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    The recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Groff v. DeJoy is making it more difficult for employers to deny religious accommodations, and there are three takeaways employers should keep in mind, say William Cook and Matthew High at Wilson Elser.

  • Conflicting NLRB Stances Create Employer Compliance Plight

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    Contradictory positions set forth by the National Labor Relations Board’s general counsel — asserted in a recent unfair labor practice judgment against CVS and a pending case against Starbucks — place employers in a no-win dilemma when deciding whether they can provide wage and benefit improvements to both union and nonunion employees, says Alice Stock at Bond Schoeneck.

  • Biden Admin Must Take Action On Worker Surveillance

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    As companies increasingly use electronic surveillance to monitor employees, speed up work and quash organizing efforts, the Biden administration should use its well-established regulatory authority to study the problem and protect worker safety, say Matt Scherer at the Center for Democracy and Technology, and Reed Shaw at Governing for Impact.

  • Novel NLRB Action Highlights Aggressive Noncompete Stance

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    While a first-of-its-kind noncompete complaint filed by the National Labor Relations Board general counsel against a Michigan cannabis processor recently resulted in a private settlement, the action shows how broadly the general counsel views her authority over such covenants and how vigorously she intends to exercise it, say Erik Weibust and Erin Schaefer at Epstein Becker.

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