More Employment Coverage

  • April 30, 2024

    Husch Blackwell Adds Labor & Employment Litigator In LA

    Husch Blackwell LLP announced Tuesday that it is expanding its labor and employment team, adding a litigator who ran his own firm for nearly a decade as partner to its Los Angeles office.

  • April 30, 2024

    Genova Burns Adds Labor, Bankruptcy Attys In Philly, NJ

    Genova Burns LLC expanded its offices in the Philadelphia area and New Jersey this week with the additions of attorneys specializing in labor and bankruptcy law.

  • April 29, 2024

    Paper Co.'s $31M Theft Claim Trimmed Before Coverage Trial

    A paper manufacturer's insurer needn't pay $2.7 million of the over $31 million the manufacturer said it lost from an employee's theft scheme, a Tennessee federal court ruled while rejecting the insurer's position that the company's $15 million settlement with the employee breached its policy.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ga. Judicial Watchdog Sets Date For Judge's Ethics Trial

    The ethics hearing of a Georgia judge accused of calling litigants names, sexually harassing attorneys and courthouse employees, and trying to get a friend's children out of legal trouble is set for June, according to an order filed Friday in the Georgia Supreme Court.

  • April 29, 2024

    Wash. Solar Co. Will Pay $465K To End Noncompete Suit

    A Washington state judge has given a preliminary nod to a $465,000 settlement to end litigation accusing a residential solar energy equipment company of forcing workers to sign illegal noncompete clauses as a condition of employment.

  • April 29, 2024

    Conn. Health Co., Competitor Eye Deal In Trade Secrets Suit

    Connecticut-based healthcare marketing firm Primacy LLC and a direct competitor accused of poaching top executive Matt Cyr are looking to settle a trade secrets lawsuit by pausing a preliminary injunction hearing and engaging a new magistrate judge to help them work out their differences.

  • April 29, 2024

    NCAA, Bush Tussle Over Strength Of Defamation Claims

    Former USC running back Reggie Bush's defamation brawl with the NCAA continued on Monday as the 2005 Heisman Trophy winner urged an Indiana state court to keep his lawsuit alive, arguing it is too early to throw the case out as the NCAA wishes.

  • April 26, 2024

    Remote Class, Medical News, More: Texas High Court Roundup

    The Supreme Court of Texas ruled on a handful of issues Friday, including the liability of universities for switching to remote learning, the responsibility of an employer for not providing a worker with concerning medical news and how a settlement credit should be applied to a final judgment.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-McKinsey Partner Says Firm Made Him Opioids 'Scapegoat'

    A former McKinsey & Co. partner lobbed defamation claims at the consulting firm, claiming Friday that it lied to the government and the public about his purported role in deleting evidence amid government investigations into the firm's work with opioid manufacturers, an alleged scheme designed to make him the "scapegoat."

  • April 26, 2024

    St. John's Hoops Players Say NCAA Can't Block Their Play

    Two St. John's University basketball players sued the NCAA Friday in New York, saying it arbitrarily denied them waivers for its "five-year rule" that prohibits student-athletes from competing in more than four seasons in any one sport, after they lost a season during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 26, 2024

    Frito-Lay Subcontractors Hit With $72M Factory Death Verdict

    A Dallas County jury has awarded a nearly $72 million verdict to the family of a man who plunged to his death at a Frito-Lay facility, finding that his employer and another subcontractor working at the facility were liable for the accident.

  • April 26, 2024

    Mich. To Pay $55M In Suit Over COVID-19 Aid Clawbacks

    Michigan's unemployment insurance agency will pay $55 million to people whose benefits were improperly clawed back without notice during the pandemic and reform its collection practices to ensure due process under a settlement that has received initial approval from a state judge.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-Walmart Worker Files Ill. BIPA Suit Over Fingerprint Scans

    Walmart is violating biometric privacy laws by gathering employees' fingerprint scans when clocking in for shifts and sharing them with various third-party identity service providers without written consent, a former employee alleges in a putative class suit.

  • April 26, 2024

    FTC's Bedoya Says Labor Concerns In Mergers Matter

    Federal Trade Commissioner Alvaro Bedoya said Friday that it's important for enforcers to consider the impact mergers can have on labor, even if they never did in the past, contending that concentration can lead to lower wages and dangerous working conditions.

  • April 26, 2024

    Truist Unit Survives Early Dismissal Bid In NC Poaching Suit

    Truist Financial Corp. and its real estate finance arm can move forward with the bulk of their suit accusing three former executives of absconding for a competitor with several dozen colleagues in tow, after North Carolina's business court judge largely denied the defendants an early exit.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-Conn. Hospital Worker Says He Was Assaulted, Then Fired

    Stamford Health Inc. terminated a hospital maintenance worker soon after he suffered a violent assault in the workplace, claiming that he abandoned his job even though it failed to provide him with necessary paperwork to take medical leave, according to an amended lawsuit filed Friday in Connecticut federal court.

  • April 26, 2024

    Off The Bench: Nassar Victims, Bush V. NCAA, New ACC Suit

    In this week's Off The Bench, the U.S. Department of Justice cuts a nine-figure deal for botching its sexual abuse investigation of disgraced USA Gymnastics physician Larry Nassar, college football legend Reggie Bush plows ahead with an NCAA defamation suit despite reclaiming his Heisman trophy, and Florida sues the ACC to detail its lucrative media rights contracts.

  • April 26, 2024

    11th Circ. Finds No Anti-Black Juror Bias In Murder Trial

    The Eleventh Circuit has denied a new trial to a Mexican man arguing prosecutors used all but one of their peremptory strikes to exclude potential jurors who were Black or Hispanic at the trial in Georgia where he was sentenced to life in prison for murdering a whistleblower connected to his work.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-BP Commodities Trader Says Co. Reneged On Bonus

    A former BP commodities trader accused the company in Texas federal court of shorting him to the tune of $6 million when it abruptly fired him in January 2022 and paid him a smaller bonus than the $11 million he expected to receive.

  • April 26, 2024

    JPMorgan Says Ex-Adviser Is Pilfering Clients For Wells Fargo

    J.P. Morgan has accused a former investment management adviser of trying to poach clients for her new job at a competing Wells Fargo unit, saying she's been making unsolicited phone calls and sending emails to convince clients to leave in breach of her employment contract.

  • April 25, 2024

    Tesla Says Investors May Want To Influence Shareholder Vote

    Tesla on Thursday questioned the motives of investors who want billions of dollars in company stock put into a trust, saying that their push to hasten the court's decision in their suit over Elon Musk's compensation plan raises concerns that they want to "elicit commentary" ahead of a shareholder meeting.

  • April 25, 2024

    Lockheed Martin Sued By Widow Over 'Toxic Stew' At Facility

    The widow of a former Lockheed Martin Corp. employee sued the aerospace defense company on Wednesday in Florida federal court, alleging her husband died because of Lockheed's "reckless mismanagement" of dangerous chemicals at a weapons manufacturing facility.

  • April 25, 2024

    Judge Reopens Allstate Trade Secrets Case Against Ex-Agent

    A Colorado federal judge has partially reopened a case alleging that a former Allstate exclusive agent poached customers for another agency, directing the ex-agent to explain why he shouldn't be held in contempt in the lawsuit.

  • April 25, 2024

    Judge Questions Equal Payouts In $9M White Castle BIPA Deal

    An Illinois federal judge said Thursday he would grant preliminary approval to a $9.4 million settlement resolving a class action targeting White Castle's biometric timekeeping practices but added he wants more information on why all employees are poised to receive the same recovery regardless of how long they worked there.

Expert Analysis

  • What 2 Years Of Ukraine-Russia Conflict Can Teach Cos.

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    A few key legal lessons for the global business community since Russia's invasion of Ukraine could help protect global commerce in times of future conflict, including how to respond to disparate trade restrictions and sanctions, navigate war-related contract disputes, and protect against heightened cybersecurity risks, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 3 Litigation Strategies To Combat 'Safetyism'

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    Amid the rise of safetyism — the idea that every person should be free from the risk of harm or discomfort — among jurors and even judges, defense counsel can mount several tactics from the very start of litigation to counteract these views and blunt the potential for jackpot damages, says Ann Marie Duffy at Hollingsworth.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • What To Know About Employee Retention Credit Disclosures

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    Employers that filed potentially erroneous employee retention credit claims should take certain steps to determine whether the IRS’ voluntary disclosure program is a good fit and, if so, prepare a strong application before the window closes on March 22, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • 5 Things Trial Attorneys Can Learn From Good Teachers

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    Jennifer Cuculich at IMS Legal Strategies recounts lessons she learned during her time as a math teacher that can help trial attorneys connect with jurors, from the importance of framing core issues to the incorporation of different learning styles.

  • What Workplace Violence Law Means For Texas Healthcare

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    While no federal laws address violence against healthcare workers, Texas has recently enacted statutory protections that take effect later this year — so facilities in the state should understand their new obligations under the law, and employers in other states would be wise to take notice as well, say attorneys at Bradley Arant.

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • 5 Ways To Hone Deposition Skills And Improve Results

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Depositions must never be taken for granted in the preparations needed to win a dispositive motion or a trial, and five best practices, including knowing when to hire a videographer, can significantly improve outcomes, says James Argionis at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • Navigating Trade Secret Litigation In A High-Stakes Landscape

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    Recent eye-popping verdicts are becoming increasingly common in trade secret litigation — but employers can take several proactive steps to protect proprietary information and defend against misappropriation accusations in order to avoid becoming the next headline, say Jessica Mason and Jack FitzGerald at Foley & Lardner.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

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    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • The Pros And Cons Of Protecting AI As Trade Secrets

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    Despite regulatory trends toward greater transparency of artificial intelligence models, federal policy acknowledges, and perhaps endorses, trade secret protection for AI information, but there are still hurdles in keeping AI information a secret, say Jennifer Maisel and Andrew Stewart at Rothwell Figg.

  • Complying With Enforcers' Ephemeral Messaging Guidance

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    Given federal antitrust enforcers’ recently issued guidance on ephemeral messaging applications, organizations must take a proactive approach to preserving short-lived communications — or risk criminal obstruction charges and civil discovery sanctions, say attorneys at Manatt.

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