Immigration

  • April 19, 2024

    Feds Say Texas' Reliance On Justices In SB 4 Case Is Misplaced

    The U.S. Department of Justice told the Fifth Circuit on Friday that contrary to Texas' contention, two recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions don't knock down a district court injunction stopping Texas officials from arresting and deporting migrants suspected of crossing the border without authorization.

  • April 19, 2024

    Wrongful Detention Suit Illustrates Pitfalls Of ICE Lockups

    A Salvadoran woman's recent lawsuit alleging immigration authorities locked her up for months despite her protected status highlights how authorized immigrants, and sometimes even U.S. citizens, can wind up being wrongfully detained, and how, with no right to counsel in immigration proceedings, it can prove difficult to free them.

  • April 19, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Abortions & Presidential Immunity

    The U.S. Supreme Court will return Monday for the term's final week of oral arguments, during which it will consider several high-stakes disputes, including whether a federal healthcare law can preempt state abortion bans and whether former President Donald Trump is entitled to immunity from criminal charges related to official acts.

  • April 19, 2024

    Fla. Can't Wage Real Estate War On Foreigners, 11th Circ. Told

    A group of Chinese citizens and a brokerage firm urged the Eleventh Circuit on Friday to block Florida from enforcing a law prohibiting certain foreign nationals from owning land while they challenge the statute's constitutionality, saying it's discriminatory and preempted by federal authority.

  • April 19, 2024

    Staffing Co. Can't Escape Bar On Task Order Protests

    A staffing firm can't escape the "gravitational field" of a rule restricting the U.S. Court of Federal Claims' authority to review task orders, a judge has said, ditching its challenge to being disqualified from orders reserved for women-owned small businesses.

  • April 18, 2024

    Texas Says Justices' Takings Decision Saves Its Arrest Law

    Texas has pointed the Fifth Circuit to a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision, arguing that it supports the state's bid to undo a district court injunction blocking state officials from arresting and deporting immigrants suspected of crossing the border unlawfully.

  • April 18, 2024

    BNP Paribas Can't Escape Suit Over Sudan's Rights Abuses

    A New York federal judge on Thursday largely denied BNP Paribas SA's request for an early win in a lawsuit accusing it of funding the former Sudan government's human rights violations, saying the Sudanese refugee plaintiffs have pointed to a "multitude of proofs" showing the bank's "conscious assistance" and knowledge of Sudan' genocidal acts.

  • April 18, 2024

    Weather Data Dooms Co.'s H-2B Visa Bid For Warm Months

    A U.S. Department of Labor judge rejected a concrete company's efforts to hire seasonal workers from spring to fall, pointing out that its weather data undermined claims that it was seeking workers during warm-weather months favorable to concrete work.

  • April 18, 2024

    Feds Say Texas' Asylum Fight Must Go After La. Suit Got Axed

    The Biden administration told a Texas federal judge Wednesday that the Lone Star state's lawsuit challenging a Biden administration rule broadening immigration officers' power to expedite asylum applications must be tossed in light of a recent decision in Louisiana throwing out nearly identical claims lodged by 19 Republican-led states.

  • April 18, 2024

    DHS Watchdog Finds Use Of Force Issues In Fla. ICE Facility

    Officers at a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention facility in Miami used inappropriate force on detainees, including pepper-spraying a harmless and isolated individual through a slot in a cell door, according to a government watchdog report.

  • April 18, 2024

    Immigrant Sues USCIS Over Denial Of I-130 Bids For Children

    A naturalized U.S. citizen sued the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services on Wednesday, demanding the agency reverse a decision that she said improperly denied her I-130 petitions for permanent residency for her four children.

  • April 17, 2024

    Salvadoran Deported By Mistake Ends Suit Over Injuries Abroad

    A Salvadoran man who was wrongly deported by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has ended his suit over the abuse he suffered in a Salvadoran prison, after reaching a settlement with the federal government, according to Massachusetts federal court documents.

  • April 17, 2024

    Lack Of Standing Sinks GOP States' Asylum Policy Challenge

    A Louisiana federal judge dismissed Republican-led states' lawsuit attacking a Biden administration rule that facilitates the quick adjudication of asylum applications at the border, saying the states failed to link an alleged increase in asylees to increased public benefit costs.

  • April 17, 2024

    Senate Dems Make Short Work Of Mayorkas Impeachment

    Senate Democrats on Wednesday followed through on a promise to quickly dismiss articles of impeachment against U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, sidestepping a trial despite Republican opposition and attempts to postpone the proceedings.

  • April 17, 2024

    WashU Medical School Settles Claims Of Asylee Bias, Firing

    The Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has settled claims that it fired a worker who complained that he was being forced to prove he held asylum, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • April 16, 2024

    GEO Asks Judge To Again Bar NJ Immigration Detention Law

    GEO Group has asked a New Jersey federal judge in a new complaint to enjoin enforcement of a state law prohibiting private detention facilities from contracting with federal immigration authorities, saying the judge had already barred the law's enforcement against a fellow prison operator, CoreCivic.

  • April 16, 2024

    7th Circ. Open To Religious Workers' Visa Rule Challenge

    Religious institutions trying to revive their challenge to a visa regulation they contend unfairly strips work authorization from foreign ministers seemed to strike a chord with a Seventh Circuit panel on Tuesday, which suggested the rule might disadvantage religious workers.

  • April 16, 2024

    Son's Health Issues Not Enough To Prevent Dad's Deportation

    A father could not convince the Tenth Circuit on Tuesday that his son's medical and educational issues warranted reopening his deportation case, his efforts to stay in the country undercut by evidence that the boy's condition was treatable.

  • April 16, 2024

    Judge Won't Rethink Wash. ICE Detention Hygiene Bill Injunction

    A Washington federal judge stood by his month-old ruling that blocked the state from conducting surprise inspections at an immigration detention facility, saying the state hadn't shown that his decision was legally incorrect.

  • April 16, 2024

    Credit Union And 'Dreamers' Get Initial OK To Settle Bias Suit

    A California federal judge preliminarily approved a settlement offering cash to individuals who accused Alliant Credit Union of denying them loans for being asylum claimants, recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program or dependents of employment-based visa holders.

  • April 15, 2024

    Gov't Says Mich. Court Lacks Authority Over U-Visa Delay Suit

    The federal government on Friday urged a Michigan federal court to toss a proposed class action alleging unreasonable decision delays in U-visa petitions, saying the court wouldn't be able to cure the visa-seeking plaintiffs' alleged harm of being unable to work.

  • April 15, 2024

    Counties Say Colo. Can't Limit Their Cooperation With ICE

    Two Colorado counties filed a lawsuit Monday challenging state laws that restrict how local governments can work with federal immigration authorities, arguing that the state constitution forbids such interference with a local government's ability to cooperate with the federal government.

  • April 15, 2024

    Bond Co. Asks For Life-Saving Pause On $811M Fine

    Immigration bonding company Libre by Nexus Inc. has begged a Virginia federal court for more time to pay an $811 million judgment for predatory bonding practices, saying it would collapse if forced to pay before it can execute its transfer to a new owner.

  • April 15, 2024

    Feds Tells Justices US Citizen Lacks Interest In Spouse's Visa

    The U.S. State Department told the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday that U.S. citizens don't have a constitutional right to know why consular officers deny their spouses' visas, saying that any requirement to provide an explanation would raise national security concerns.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Revive 7 Immigration Appeals After Hardship Ruling

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday granted certiorari in seven cases and remanded all of them in light of its recent ruling that circuit courts have the authority to review hardship determinations in immigration appeals.

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Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • How AI Executive Order Aims To Compete For Foreign Talent

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    Immigration provisions within the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence take a strategic approach to promoting the U.S. as a destination for AI and STEM talent by streamlining visa processing, enhancing educational and exchange programs, and improving current visa programs and pathways to permanent residency, says Eric Bord at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Expect CFPB Flex Over Large Nonbank Payment Cos.

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    A recent enforcement action and a new rule proposal from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau indicate a growing focus on the nonbank payment ecosystem, especially larger participants, in 2024, say Felix Shipkevich and Jessica Livingston at Shipkevich.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • What New DHS Cybersecurity Policy Means For Bid Protests

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    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's recently unveiled policy of factoring cybersecurity self-assessments into its overall evaluation of contractors could raise novel bid protest considerations for offerors in both the pre-award and post-award contexts, say Amy Hoang at Seyfarth and Sandeep Kathuria at L3Harris Technologies.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Navigating USCIS' New Minimum EB-5 Investment Period

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    Recent significant modifications to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ EB-5 at-risk requirement are causing uncertainty for several reasons, but investors who consider certain key aspects of prospective projects can mitigate the immigration and investment risks, say Samuel Silverman at EB5AN, Ronald Klasko at Klasko Immigration, and Kate Kalmykov at Greenberg Traurig.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

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