Intellectual Property

  • May 10, 2024

    Densify, VMware Settle Patent Case After $85M Verdict

    Densify and the Dell spinoff VMware notified a Delaware federal judge on Friday that they had decided to settle a suit after VMware last year was ordered to pay nearly $85 million for infringing patents over new ways of designing virtual environments.

  • May 10, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Backs ITC Decision Clearing Computer Gear Imports

    The Federal Circuit on Friday upheld the U.S. International Trade Commission's holding that CommScope, Hewlett Packard, Netgear and others didn't infringe Q3 Networking's computer gear patents with their imports of things like routers.

  • May 10, 2024

    Pharmaceutical Cos. Can't Nix Parkinson's Drug Antitrust Suit

    A Delaware federal judge has issued a sealed order refusing to dismiss drugmakers Sage Chemical Inc. and TruPharma's antitrust suit accusing rival Supernus Pharmaceuticals and others of suppressing generic versions of the Parkinson's treatment Apokyn.

  • May 10, 2024

    1st Circ. Fast-Tracks DraftKings Noncompete Feud

    The First Circuit on Friday granted a former DraftKings executive's request to expedite his appeal of a Boston federal judge's ruling that blocked him from doing similar work in the U.S. for rival Fanatics. 

  • May 10, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Questions Claim Construction In Google Ad Row

    Federal Circuit judges took issue with a district court's claim construction in digital advertising company Impact Engine's infringement summary judgment loss to Google, but questioned why the ad startup didn't raise its objections earlier.

  • May 10, 2024

    Oakland Says SF Has No TM Rights To 'San Francisco Bay'

    The city of Oakland has pushed back at San Francisco's trademark infringement complaint over Oakland's plan to incorporate "San Francisco Bay" into its airport name, arguing that the Golden Gate City's claims are doomed because its airport is not even located in San Francisco.

  • May 10, 2024

    X Corp.'s Data Scraping Suit Stymied By Copyright Act

    A California federal judge has dismissed X Corp.'s suit accusing an Israeli company of mining and selling user data culled from its platform, noting that X's claims would allow it to block others from distributing publicly available user content and are preempted by the Copyright Act.

  • May 10, 2024

    JLM Couture Nears Settlement With Bridal Dress Designer

    Dressmaker JLM Couture told Delaware's bankruptcy court Friday it reached an agreement in principle with a bridal dress designer, who was sued by the company and had sought to convert its Chapter 11 case into a Chapter 7 liquidation.

  • May 10, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Translator's Plea, NBA Star Tops Agent

    In this week's Off The Bench, Shohei Ohtani's ex-interpreter will plead guilty, an NBA star wins in his clash with the agent who sought to represent him, and a tennis player who was abused by her former coach is awarded $9 million.

  • May 10, 2024

    Tobacco Wholesaler Must Post $1.4M Bond Pending IP Appeal

    A cigarette rolling paper wholesaler must post a more than $1.4 million bond while the company appeals its portion of a larger $2.3 million verdict for selling counterfeit papers, a Georgia federal judge has ruled.

  • May 10, 2024

    Jury Says Microsoft Owes $242M For Infringing IPA Patent

    A Delaware federal jury on Friday found that Microsoft infringed a trio of claims in a patent initially issued to a company that developed Apple's Siri software, handing the patent owner $242 million.

  • May 10, 2024

    Fox Rothschild Hires Ex-Seed IP Trio On The West Coast

    Fox Rothschild is bringing on more intellectual property talent on the West Coast, announcing Friday that it had added three former Seed IP attorneys to its Seattle offices.

  • May 09, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Lifts Ban On Generic Cos.' Bladder Drugs

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday rejected Astellas Pharma's latest effort to stop the launch of generic drugs that would compete with its own blockbuster overactive bladder medication and lifted a temporary ban that was put in place by the appeals court in April.

  • May 09, 2024

    AI-Created Database Isn't Copyrightable, Job Search Co. Says

    Job searching platform Tarta.ai has urged a California federal judge to toss a suit accusing it of stealing rival Jobiak LLC's automated database and using it for its own job postings, arguing that Jobiak's website is not subject to copyright protection because it's powered by artificial intelligence.

  • May 09, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Wary Of Undoing Gilstrap's Toss Of Banking IP Suit

    The Federal Circuit didn't seem convinced Thursday morning that a patent case against online stockbroker TD Ameritrade had been wrongly tossed out of court, with a judge at one point telling banking patent owner Island Intellectual Property that "this is all abstract."

  • May 09, 2024

    High Court Leaves Discovery Rule Question For Another Day

    The U.S. Supreme Court's majority opinion Thursday that plaintiffs in copyright ownership disputes can recover damages past the three-year statute of limitations could lead to an increase in claims for infringing acts that occurred decades before, while leaving uncertainty about whether the so-called discovery rule that widened the time window for claims even exists, according to attorneys.

  • May 09, 2024

    Nintendo Gets Switch Suit Stay Pending Patent Review

    A Seattle federal judge agreed Thursday that Nintendo could pause an intellectual property suit against it while it seeks to challenge the validity of the patents at issue, saying the plaintiff could not now complain about delays since it waited six years to file its complaint.

  • May 09, 2024

    Judge Clarifies Gilead Didn't Directly Infringe HIV Drug IP

    A Delaware federal judge on Thursday rejected Gilead Sciences' request to amend her judgment finding that two medications in its HIV prevention regimen, Truvada and Descovy, directly infringed the government's invalidated patents, but clarified her judgment to say that non-party patients or physicians committed the infringement.

  • May 09, 2024

    USPTO Says TM Applicants' Data Was Accidentally Leaked

    About 14,000 trademark applicants have been notified by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that some of their personal information had accidentally been released publicly, with the agency saying it happened over an eight-month period.

  • May 09, 2024

    Wisconsin Co., Hong Kong Biz To Drop Cup Holder IP Dispute

    A Wisconsin business and a Hong Kong furniture maker are looking to end their long-winding patent and trade dress dispute over cup holders, years after a jury handed the Badger State company a $100 million award that was later significantly reduced by the court.

  • May 09, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Skeptical Allergan Illegally Extended Exclusivity

    A Federal Circuit panel seemed doubtful Thursday that a patent covering Allergan's bowel treatment drug Viberzi should have its life cut short based on the expiration date of related patents, in oral arguments over obviousness-type double patenting.

  • May 09, 2024

    Lynk Labs Says Tech Group Is Samsung's 'Mouthpiece'

    Lynk Labs Inc. has asked the Federal Circuit to throw out a brief from the High Tech Inventors Alliance in support of Samsung in a case where the tech giant won a Patent Trial and Appeal Board challenge to a Lynk Labs LED patent.

  • May 09, 2024

    FICO Blasts Discovery 'Sideshows' In VantageScore Suit

    An Illinois federal judge handling antitrust claims targeting the credit-scoring market should disregard the "sideshows" customers lodged by requesting confidential settlement records and other documents that are too far removed from the case's core issues, Fair Isaac Corp. argued on Wednesday.

  • May 09, 2024

    Texas Judge Slashes Nike Atty Fee Request In Trademark Suit

    A Texas federal judge was not convinced Nike's attorneys and staff spent more than 750 hours to defend a trademark infringement suit brought by a digital creator, awarding them $25,000 instead of the $570,000 in attorney fees the company requested.

  • May 09, 2024

    Justices Say Copyright Damages Can Go Beyond 3 Years

    The U.S. Supreme Court concluded Thursday that plaintiffs in copyright ownership disputes can recover damages beyond the three-year statute of limitations for bringing a claim, rejecting Warner Chappell Music's argument that the only time that could happen is in cases involving fraud.

Expert Analysis

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • UK Amazon Ruling Spotlights TM Rights In International Sales

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    Highlighting the conflict between the territorial nature of trademark rights and the borderless nature of the internet, the U.K. Supreme Court's recent decision — that Amazon's U.S. website could infringe EU and U.K. rights by targeting local buyers — offers guidance on navigating trademark rights in relation to online sales, say Emmy Hunt, Mark Kramer and Jordan Mitchell at Potter Clarkson.

  • CORRECTED: Endoscope Patent Case Offers Guidance On Right To Repair

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    An Alabama federal court's decision in Karl Storz v. IMS reaffirmed that product owners have broad rights to repair or modify their property as they see fit, highlighting the parameters of the right to repair in the context of patent infringement, say Dustin Weeks and Dabney Carr at Troutman Pepper. Correction: Due to an editing error, a previous version of this article and headline attributed the Karl Storz ruling to the wrong court. The error has been corrected.

  • Timing Is Key For Noninfringing Alternatives In Patent Cases

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    A Texas district court’s recent ruling in Smart Path Connections v. Nokia may affect the timing of expert disclosures and opinion regarding noninfringing alternatives in patent infringement litigation, for both defendants and plaintiffs, says Alexander Clemons at Ocean Tomo.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • Film Plagiarism Claims May Foreshadow AI Copyright Issues

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    The contentious plagiarism dispute over the Oscar-nominated screenplay for "The Holdovers" may portend the challenges screenwriters will face when attempting to prove copyright infringement against scripts generated by artificial intelligence technology, says Craig Smith at Lando & Anastasi.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • The Tricky Implications Of New Calif. Noncompete Laws

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    Two new California noncompete laws that ban certain out-of-state agreements and require employers to notify certain workers raise novel issues related to mergers and acquisitions, and pose particular challenges for technology companies, says John Viola at Thompson Coburn.

  • Patent Ownership Issues In Light Of USPTO AI Guidance

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    Recently published guidance from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office establishes that inventions created using artificial intelligence may be patentable if a human also significantly contributes, but ownership and legal rights in these types of patents are different issues that require further assessment, says Karl Gross at Leydig Voit.

  • Opinion

    Why USPTO Should Issue Inherency Guidance Memo

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    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office should issue a new guidance memo in regard to the standard for inherency during the examination process, as the standard is frequently misapplied during prosecution, and consistency of the standard in the USPTO should match that in the federal courts, says Irving Feit at Lucas & Mercanti.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • How Suit Over An AI George Carlin May Lead To Legislation

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    George Carlin’s estate recently sued a company over an artificial intelligence-generated podcast allegedly impersonating the late comedian, highlighting the importance of much-needed state and federal protection against unauthorized representations of an individual’s image in the time of AI, say Anna Chauvet and Maxime Jarquin at Finnegan.

  • Parsing Chinese Governance On AI-Generated Content

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    As essential risk-mitigation, companies with a China reach should be aware of recent developments in Chinese oversight of AI-generated content, including the latest rulings and regulations as well as the updated ambit for supervisory bodies, say Jet Deng and Ken Dai at Dacheng.

  • Negotiating Milestones In Pharma Licenses Requires Care

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    For life sciences companies, understanding the unique issues that arise in licensing agreements' milestone payment provisions can increase the likelihood and amount of payments received by the licensor and ensure payments are carefully and closely tied to events that truly drive value for the licensee, say Edward Angelini at Amneal Pharmaceutical and Lori Waldron at Sills Cummis.

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