Personal Injury & Medical Malpractice

  • May 13, 2024

    Justices Won't Review Ch. 11 Stay In Asbestos Cases

    The U.S. Supreme Court won't review lower courts' decisions allowing the paper-products company Georgia-Pacific to remain shielded from mass tort litigation by way of a subsidiary's Chapter 11 case.

  • May 10, 2024

    Fla. Agency Forced Resignation Over Mental Illness, Suit Says

    A former employee of a Florida insurance regulatory agency is suing her onetime employer in federal court, alleging a supervisor made her quit after falsely suspecting she may have bipolar disorder.

  • May 10, 2024

    Lab Exec Sentenced For Deadly Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

    The founder of a Massachusetts drug compounding center was sentenced in Michigan to 10 to 15 years in prison for his role in a fungal meningitis outbreak after he agreed to a plea deal with state prosecutors earlier this year.

  • May 10, 2024

    FAA Faces $15M Suit Over NC Woman's Plane Crash Death

    A plane crash victim's estate brought a $15 million complaint against the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to North Carolina federal court, alleging the government's air traffic controllers led her pilot into the severe weather, which resulted in a crash and both of their deaths.

  • May 10, 2024

    Full 4th Circ. Urged To Settle Key 'Texas Two-Step' Questions

    A Fourth Circuit panel left critical issues open when it denied permission to an appeal challenging the so-called Texas two-step Chapter 11 of industrial equipment maker Aldrich Pump, asbestos claimants in two separate bankruptcy cases said, asking the full appeals court to reconsider hearing the case and settle questions that have plagued their own bankruptcies in the Western District of North Carolina.

  • May 10, 2024

    Walmart Must Pay $1M Injury Verdict, Ga. Appeals Court Says

    The Georgia Court of Appeals won't give Walmart a way out of a $1 million verdict owed to a woman injured in a store in 2018, dispatching Friday with the retail chain's argument that the verdict was blatantly excessive.

  • May 10, 2024

    Michigan Dept. Gets Snowmobile Crash Claims Tossed

    A Michigan appeals panel has thrown out a man's claims alleging one of the state's Department of Natural Resources rangers was negligent in a suit over a crash that claimed that ranger's life, saying the lack of evidence renders the plaintiff's theory of negligence hypothetical and speculative.

  • May 10, 2024

    Texas Justices Limit Damages In Unwanted Pregnancy Case

    The Texas Supreme Court said Friday that a woman who sued her doctor for failing to perform a sterilization procedure can't collect damages for emotional and physical pain in connection with her wrongful pregnancy claim, holding that the birth of a healthy child isn't a compensable injury but "a life with inherent dignity and profound, immeasurable value."

  • May 10, 2024

    Insurers Don't Owe Chiquita Coverage In Terrorism Settlement

    An Ohio state appeals court ruled Friday that Chiquita Brands International Inc. is not owed coverage by a group of insurers for a settlement with families of six Americans killed by a terrorist group Chiquita had paid for protection, saying any errors the trial court made were harmless because it came to the correct conclusion.

  • May 10, 2024

    Dollar Tree Parent Sued Over Alleged Lead In Cinnamon

    Dollar Tree Inc.'s parent company and a New York family-owned food business were hit Thursday with a proposed class action in New York federal court alleging that the chain sold cinnamon that was contaminated with lead, following U.S. Food and Drug Administration recalls of lead-tainted cinnamon.

  • May 10, 2024

    Atty's Remarks On Race And Gender Sink $12M Texas Verdict

    The Supreme Court of Texas on Friday threw out a $12.45 million jury verdict awarded to a couple who were rear-ended on a highway, citing the plaintiffs' counsel's "inflammatory" and "unprovoked" accusation that the defendants wanted a lower award because one of the plaintiffs is a Black woman.

  • May 10, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Translator's Plea, NBA Star Tops Agent

    In this week's Off The Bench, Shohei Ohtani's ex-interpreter will plead guilty, an NBA star wins in his clash with the agent who sought to represent him, and a tennis player who was abused by her former coach is awarded $9 million.

  • May 10, 2024

    NJ Attys Settle Malpractice Suit Over Wawa Injury Claim

    Attorneys at a New Jersey law firm have settled a malpractice lawsuit from a former client who claimed they caused him to lose his chance to sue convenience store chain Wawa over an on-the-job injury, according to a letter submitted Thursday to state court.

  • May 10, 2024

    4th Circ. Tosses Driver's Allstate UIM Appeal As Untimely

    The Fourth Circuit dismissed a South Carolina woman's appeal seeking underinsured motorist coverage from Allstate for injuries she suffered in a car accident, finding Friday that the appellate court lacked jurisdiction over the issue because outstanding, competing claims in the action remained.

  • May 10, 2024

    Axl Rose Shouldn't Escape NY Sex Assault Suit, Model Says

    A former Penthouse model is urging a New York state court not to toss her case alleging Axl Rose sexually assaulted her in 1989, arguing the Guns N' Roses lead singer is making faulty arguments about attempts to serve him with the suit to avoid accountability.

  • May 10, 2024

    Exxon Hit With $725M Verdict In Benzene Exposure Suit

    A Philadelphia jury has awarded $725.5 million to a New York service station mechanic for his claims that Exxon Mobil Corp. failed to warn consumers about the health risks of benzene in its products, and that his exposure to the chemical was responsible for his leukemia diagnosis.

  • May 10, 2024

    Atty Ready For Astroworld Wrongful Death Trial 'Tomorrow'

    An attorney for the family of the youngest victim of the 2021 Astroworld tragedy said he's ready to try his case "tomorrow," a day after lawyers for the nine other victims' families confirmed that their wrongful death cases had settled.

  • May 09, 2024

    Senate Approves FAA Reauthorization Bill

    The U.S. Senate on Thursday passed legislation reauthorizing the Federal Aviation Administration's safety and airport improvement programs in a package that includes hiring thousands more air traffic controllers and inspectors, among other things.

  • May 09, 2024

    'Love Is Blind' Producer Can't Evade Imprisonment Suit

    A Texas appellate court found Thursday that the producers of the Netflix reality show "Love is Blind" can't fully escape an assault and negligence suit brought by a Season 5 contestant, saying the contestant could keep her claims of imprisonment and negligence in the Lone Star State.

  • May 09, 2024

    3 Engineering Firms Sued Over Pittsburgh Bridge Collapse

    Three engineering firms share responsibility with the city of Pittsburgh for the collapse of the Fern Hollow Bridge in 2022, a new lawsuit alleges, claiming the engineers failed to flag how dangerous and deteriorated the bridge was for years before it fell.

  • May 09, 2024

    Walmart Slips Out Of $1.3M Judgment In Icy Slip-And-Fall Suit

    A New Jersey state appeals court overturned a jury verdict and $1.3 million judgment awarded to a woman who slipped and fell at a Walmart parking lot, saying the trial judge was required to tell the jury about the state high court's ongoing storm rule.

  • May 09, 2024

    Wash. Justices Say HR Managers Can Accept Service For Co.

    The Washington State Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that a human resources manager is classified under state law as someone who can receive service on a company's behalf, siding with a personal injury plaintiff in a lawsuit against an Evergreen State nursing home.

  • May 09, 2024

    11th Circ. Urged To Reconsider Ruling In Cancer Cluster Case

    A group of Florida families asked the Eleventh Circuit on Thursday to reconsider its decision affirming a jury verdict that found defense contractor Pratt & Whitney was not liable for a cancer cluster near the company's former rocket testing site, arguing that the panel affirmed a legally deficient verdict form.

  • May 09, 2024

    Northwestern Sees 3 More Ex-Footballers File Hazing Suits

    Three more former Northwestern football players have slapped the university with lawsuits over hazing they allegedly experienced while playing on the university's team.

  • May 09, 2024

    Doc Can't Escape Second Prednisone Overprescribing Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge won't strike claims for punitive damages and references to "outrageous" conduct from a complaint alleging that a doctor wrongly overprescribed medications including prednisone, saying the complaint plausibly alleged that he knowingly had a patient on a medication plan that harmed her.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Verizon Benefits Ruling Clears Up Lien Burden Of Proof

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    A Rhode Island federal court recently ruled that a Verizon benefits plan could not recoup a former employee’s settlement funds from the attorney who represented her in a personal injury case, importantly clarifying two Employee Retirement Income Security Act burden of proof issues that were previously unsettled, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • A Look Into How Jurors Reach High Damages Awards

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    In the wake of several large jury awards, Richard Gabriel and Emily Shaw at Decision Analysis shed light on challenges that jurors have in deciding them, the nonevidentiary and extra-legal methods they use to do so, and new research about the themes and jury characteristics of high-damages jurors.

  • Opinion

    Food Safety Bill Needed To Protect Kids From Heavy Metals

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    The recent announcement by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that hundreds of children may have been exposed to unsafe lead levels in applesauce highlights the continuing failure by Congress to pass legislation that would require baby food manufacturers to ensure safer levels of heavy metals in their products, says Vineet Dubey at Custodio & Dubey.

  • Opinion

    3rd-Party Financiers Have Power To Drive Mass Tort Cases

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    The abnormal recovery premium presented by modern mass tort cases coupled with their deemphasized role for attorneys creates an opportunity for third-party financiers to both create and control these cases, says Samir Parikh at Lewis & Clark Law School.

  • Preparing For A New Wave Of Litigation Under Silicosis Rules

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    After the Division of Occupational Safety and Health of California issued an emergency temporary standard to combat noncompliance with assessments of workers' exposure to particles of crystalline silica, companies that manufacture, distribute or sell silica-containing products will need aggressive case-specific discovery to navigate a new wave of litigation, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Opinion

    Gilead Ruling Signals That Innovating Can Lead To Liability

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    A California appeals court's ruling last month in Gilead Life Sciences v. Superior Court of San Francisco that a drug manufacturer can be held liable for delaying the introduction of an improved version of its medication raises concerns about the chilling effects that expansive product liability claims may have on innovation, says Gary Myers at the University of Missouri School of Law.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Ch. 11 Ruling Highlights 'Two-Step' Challenges In 4th Circ.

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    A North Carolina bankruptcy court’s recent ruling in Bestwall’s Chapter 11 case, and the decision's interpretation of Fourth Circuit law, suggests that, compared to other circuits, it may be more difficult to dismiss so-called Texas Two-Step bankruptcy cases within the Fourth Circuit, say Brittany Falabella and Kollin Bender at Hirschler Fleischer.

  • How Facilities Can Address Legal Risk Of Wandering Patients

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    Wandering behavior in acute care facilities is a challenging healthcare issue rife with legal ramifications, so it's crucial for facilities to perform the correct risk assessments and appropriate interventions, says legal nurse consultant Marilyn McCullum.

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