Project Finance

  • June 03, 2024

    States Say Biden Admin's LNG Export Pause Is Actually A Ban

    A coalition of Republican-led states is urging a Louisiana federal court not to toss its lawsuit challenging the Biden administration's pause on reviewing applications to export liquefied natural gas to countries without free trade agreements, saying the pause effectively amounts to a ban because no timeline is provided.

  • May 31, 2024

    Nord Stream 2 Says EU Pipeline Regs Violate Int'l Law

    The Russian majority-owned company behind the development of a politically sensitive natural gas pipeline from Russia to Germany has resumed its efforts to convince an international tribunal that the European Union's "sole objective" in amending regulations for the natural gas market was to complicate the pipeline project.

  • May 31, 2024

    Wash. Prison Law Not Biased Against GEO, 9th Circ. Told

    Washington state has urged the Ninth Circuit to lift a lower court's injunction blocking a law aimed at improving private prison standards, saying the law does not discriminatorily target private prison operator GEO Group Inc.

  • May 31, 2024

    As Broadband Subsidy Ends, Biden Pushes For Renewal

    The White House pressured Congress on Friday to allocate new funding for the Affordable Connectivity Program as the subsidy officially shut down, cutting off a broadband discount to millions of low-income households.

  • May 30, 2024

    Gov't Broadband Rules Must Not Deter Providers, NTIA Told

    Small to medium-size internet providers could shy away from the federal government's massive broadband expansion program if rules requiring low-cost internet service end up being too heavy-handed, industry groups told the U.S. Department of Commerce.

  • May 30, 2024

    Swedish Appeals Court Sets Aside €10.6M Italy Award

    An appeals court in Sweden has this week set aside a €10.6 million ($11.48 million) arbitral award issued to a Dutch renewable energy firm after Italy dialed back economic incentives for the renewable energy industry, saying the award violates European Union law.

  • May 30, 2024

    FCC Subsidy Reforms Could Be Drafted On Capitol Hill Soon

    A working group on Capitol Hill studying a potential overhaul of the Federal Communications Commission's subsidy regime could produce draft reforms soon, but a big stumbling block will be how to expand contributions to the fund, telecom experts say.

  • May 30, 2024

    NY Truckers Sue To Block Congestion Pricing In Manhattan

    New York truckers have joined the fight to block congestion pricing from taking effect next month, alleging in a new Manhattan federal lawsuit Thursday that the first-of-its-kind fee for vehicles entering the Big Apple's busiest corridor unconstitutionally penalizes the trucking industry.

  • May 30, 2024

    Enviro Groups Launch Fresh Alaska LNG Fight In 9th Circ.

    Environmental groups on Thursday petitioned the Ninth Circuit to overturn federal approvals for the Alaska liquefied natural gas project covering impacts on endangered and threatened species, the latest court challenge lodged against the $43 billion project.

  • May 29, 2024

    Surety Seeks Over $2.75M In Prison Fencing Work Coverage

    A construction surety told a West Virginia federal court Wednesday that subcontractors for a prison fencing project must reimburse it for more than $2.75 million in losses it incurred while settling faulty work claims asserted by the project's general contractor.

  • May 29, 2024

    Bankrupt BlockFi Agrees To $150k Penalty In Conn. Bond Row

    Bankrupt cryptocurrency lender BlockFi has reached a deal with Connecticut's banking regulator to pay a $150,000 civil penalty over claims the company failed to maintain a required surety bond, and a decision in November 2020 to halt account withdrawals from the platform.

  • May 29, 2024

    Womble Bond Adds Veteran Energy Transaction Atty In Mass.

    An experienced corporate transactional attorney has moved stateside from Thailand to join Womble Bond Dickinson in Boston.

  • May 28, 2024

    Orsted Inks $125M Deal With NJ Over Scrapped Wind Farms

    Orsted, a Danish wind energy company, has agreed to pay New Jersey $125 million to settle claims over the company's abrupt cancellation last fall of two offshore wind farms.

  • May 28, 2024

    Iraq Says $120M Pier Award Enforcement Suit Must Be Nixed

    Iraq is fighting a D.C. federal court's default judgment enforcing a nearly $120 million arbitral award issued to a Cypriot engineering firm following a dispute over a massive €204 million ($221.6 million) project relating to a port facility that, once completed, will be among the world's largest.

  • May 28, 2024

    FERC Wrong To Backtrack On Grid Project Plan, DC Circ. Told

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission unlawfully reversed course on a regional grid operator's plan to spread out the costs of transmission upgrade projects, unfairly saddling customers within certain areas with higher bills, two Kansas electricity cooperatives have told the D.C. Circuit.

  • May 24, 2024

    HNTB's Liability Capped In Seattle Tunnel Delay Claim

    A contract clause caps engineering firm HNTB Corp.'s potential liability over a long-delayed Seattle highway tunnel project, a Washington state court judge ruled Friday, likely dashing a joint venture's bid to recover more than $700 million.

  • May 24, 2024

    Shuttered Paper Mill Flouted $12M Incentive Deal, NC AG Says

    The state of North Carolina is suing food and beverage packaging company Pactiv Evergreen to recoup $12 million in economic incentives the company allegedly accepted to keep a local mill up and running after it abruptly shuttered the facility last year.

  • May 24, 2024

    Biden's Judicial Impact And What's Left On The Wish List

    President Joe Biden secured confirmation of his 200th federal judge Wednesday and has transformed the judiciary by picking more women and people of color than any other president. But the upcoming election season could derail his hopes of confirming many more judges.

  • May 24, 2024

    IRS Corrects Notice On Bonus Energy Tax Credit Safe Harbors

    The Internal Revenue Service and U.S. Department of the Treasury issued a correction Friday to a notice providing additional safe harbors that clean energy project developers can use to qualify for bonus tax credits for domestically sourcing their steel and aluminum parts.

  • May 24, 2024

    Investor CriteriaCaixa Buys Construction Biz Stake For €983M

    Spanish investor CriteriaCaixa said on Friday that it has purchased a 9.4% stake in construction and infrastructure firm ACS for €983 million ($1.1 billion), boosting its portfolio of investments.

  • May 23, 2024

    Feds Ask 5th Circ. To Weigh Highway GHG Rule Vacatur

    The Biden administration has asked the Fifth Circuit to review a Texas district court's recent decision vacating a Federal Highway Administration rule that would've required states to set targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from federally funded highway projects.

  • May 23, 2024

    Spain Says Energy Treaty Withdrawal Irrelevant In $386M Suit

    Spain has told the D.C. Circuit that its announcement of withdrawal from the Energy Charter Treaty does not show it recognizes that it is still bound under the international agreement, contrary to what investors owed about $386 million argued earlier this week.

  • May 23, 2024

    22 States Seek To Defend EPA Heavy-Duty Truck GHG Rule

    A coalition of 22 Democrat-led states and four cities moved to intervene on Thursday in defense of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's final rule establishing greenhouse gas emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles, arguing that vacating the rule would lead to direct injuries to state lands and resources.

  • May 23, 2024

    Irma Power Outage Claims Must Be Brought To Fla. Regulator

    A Florida state appellate court reversed the class certification in a multibillion-dollar lawsuit brought against Florida Power & Light Co. over extended electricity outages during Hurricane Irma, citing a new law requiring ratepayers to bring their claims before the state's Public Service Commission.

  • May 23, 2024

    Oakland Coliseum Sold To Black-Led Biz Group For $105M

    The City of Oakland has agreed to sell its share of the Oakland Coliseum to a group of Black community, business and investment leaders for a minimum of $105 million in a deal that the city said will pave the way for affordable housing units, outdoor space and future developments.

Expert Analysis

  • What A Louisiana Ruling Means For Pipeline Crossings

    Author Photo

    After a Louisiana appeals court's recent ruling on a conflict between two pipeline projects, operators and developers should review pipeline crossings to ensure that they occur at safe distances — and keep in mind the value of crossing agreements for protecting both sides in case of a dispute, say attorneys at McGuireWoods.

  • A Look At FERC's Plan To End Reactive Power Compensation

    Author Photo

    A recent notice of proposed rulemaking indicates that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is likely to eliminate compensation for reactive power within the standard power factor range — causing significant impacts for the electric power industry, which relies on income from providing this service, say Norman Bay and Matthew Goldberg at Willkie and Vivian Chum at Wright & Talisman.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

    Author Photo

    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • A Recipe For Growth Equity Investing In A Slow M&A Market

    Author Photo

    Carl Marcellino at Ropes & Gray discusses the factors bolstering appetite for growth equity fundraising in a depressed M&A market, and walks through the deal terms and other ingredients that set growth equity transactions apart from bread-and-butter venture capital investing.

  • How EB-5 Regional Centers Can Prepare For USCIS Audits

    Author Photo

    In response to the recently announced U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services guidelines that require EB-5 regional center audits every five years to verify their compliance with immigration and securities laws, regional centers should take steps to facilitate a seamless audit process, say Jennifer Hermansky and Miriam Thompson at Greenberg Traurig.

  • As Arbitrator Bias Claims Rise, Disclosure Standards Evolve

    Author Photo

    The growth in post-award challenges based on arbitrators' alleged conflicts of interest has led to the release of new guidance and new case law on the topic — both supporting the view that professional familiarity alone does not translate to a lack of impartiality, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Don't Use The Same Template For Every Client Alert

    Author Photo

    As the old marketing adage goes, consistency is key, but law firm style guides need consistency that contemplates variety when it comes to client alert formats, allowing attorneys to tailor alerts to best fit the audience and subject matter, says Jessica Kaplan at Legally Penned.

  • In Energy Disputes, Good Arbitration Clauses Are Key

    Author Photo

    Recent trends have spawned many complex energy disputes that cross jurisdictional boundaries — but arbitration offers an optimal forum for resolving such matters, especially when arbitration provisions in contracts are tailored for the energy sector, say Scott Marrs at Akerman and Andrew Barton at the American Arbitration Association and the International Centre for Dispute Resolution.

  • Series

    Walking With My Dog Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Thanks to my dog Birdie, I've learned that carving out an activity different from the practice of law — like daily outdoor walks that allow you to interact with new people — can contribute to professional success by boosting creativity and mental acuity, as well as expanding your social network, says Sarah Petrie at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

  • Could 'General Average' Apply To The Key Bridge Crash?

    Author Photo

    While the owner and operator of the vessel that struck Baltimore's Francis Scott Key Bridge have sought legal protection under the Limitation of Liability Act, they could choose to invoke the long-standing principle of general average, if supported by the facts of the crash and the terms of their contracts with cargo owners, says Julie Maurer at Husch Blackwell.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Follow The Iron Rule Of Trial Logic

    Author Photo

    Many diligent and eager attorneys include every good fact, point and rule in their trial narratives — spurred by the gnawing fear they’ll be second-guessed for leaving something out — but this approach ignores a fundamental principle of successful trial lawyering, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • The Art Of Asking: Leveraging Your Contacts For Referrals

    Author Photo

    Though attorneys may hesitate to ask for referral recommendations to generate new business, research shows that people want to help others they know, like and trust, so consider who in your network you should approach and how to make the ask, says Rebecca Hnatowski at Edwards Advisory.

  • Wave Of Final Rules Reflects Race Against CRA Deadline

    Author Photo

    The flurry of final rules now leaping off the Federal Register press — some of which will affect entire industries and millions of Americans — shows President Joe Biden's determination to protect his regulatory legacy from reversal by the next Congress, given the impending statutory look-back period under the Congressional Review Act, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Perspectives

    Criminal Defendants Should Have Access To Foreign Evidence

    Author Photo

    A New Jersey federal court recently ordered prosecutors to obtain evidence from India on behalf of the former Cognizant Technology executives they’re prosecuting — a precedent that other courts should follow to make cross-border evidentiary requests more fair and efficient, say Kaylana Mueller-Hsia and Rebecca Wexler at UC Berkeley School of Law.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Project Finance archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!