Transportation

  • May 17, 2024

    Texas Justices Side With Car Dealership In Lease Dispute

    The Supreme Court of Texas reversed and remanded a landlord's win against its former car dealership tenant, ruling Friday that the dealership's $1.3 million jury verdict wasn't upended when it gave up its appeal of a separate eviction suit.

  • May 17, 2024

    NJ Atty Escapes Malpractice Suit Over UPS Bias Suit

    A New Jersey state appeals court on Friday refused to revive a legal malpractice lawsuit from a UPS driver alleging his ex-lawyer did not disclose his working relationship with Day Pitney LLP, the firm that represented the delivery company in the driver's underlying racial discrimination suit.

  • May 17, 2024

    Mercedes Workers Reject UAW In Blow To Organizing Drive

    Workers at Mercedes-Benz manufacturing facilities outside Tuscaloosa, Alabama, have voted against representation by the United Auto Workers, an early setback for the union as it seeks to organize nonunion automakers in the United States.

  • May 17, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen a wave of claims filed against Verity Trustees Ltd., Harley-Davidson hit retailer Next with an intellectual property claim, Turkish e-commerce entrepreneur Demet Mutlu sue her ex-husband and Trendyol co-founder Evren Üçok and the Solicitors Regulation Authority file a claim against the former boss of collapsed law firm Axiom. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 16, 2024

    DC Circ. Mulls Rolling Back Pipeline Safety Regs Over Cost

    The industry group challenging a handful of pipeline safety standards told a D.C. Circuit panel on Thursday that there will be "no fight" between it and the government on one of the regulations if the court simply rules that two terms that the agency maintains have the same definition do mean the same thing.

  • May 16, 2024

    Judge Irked By 'Smart' Attys And 'Silly' Doc Retention Policies

    The chief judge of the U.S. Court of International Trade scolded Chinese tire companies on Thursday for complaining about having to provide information the federal government requested to reassess antidumping duties after the companies won an order for that reassessment.

  • May 16, 2024

    Disinfectant Maker To Pay $1.2M To Exit Abandoned-Product Suit

    The peddler of a disinfectant that stands accused of working with Walmart to abandon millions of units of product made from unregistered chemicals, which is illegal to sell and difficult to dispose of, on two unwitting warehouse companies has reached a settlement to end a $30 million lawsuit.

  • May 16, 2024

    Flight Attendant Fights United's Bid To Exit Disability Bias Suit

    A former United Airlines flight attendant fought against the airline's bid to end her suit accusing it of firing her for not recovering from COVID-19 fast enough, arguing that the reason given for her termination — that she misused an employee travel benefit to travel to Florida while on sick leave — is not a legitimate ground to fire her.

  • May 16, 2024

    Prosecutors Say Fake Fortune 500 Workers Funded N. Korea

    The Biden administration alleged that North Korea may have raised $6.8 million to develop nuclear weapons by installing remote information technology workers at Fortune 500 businesses, announcing charges Thursday against two individuals accused of helping agents pose as U.S. employees.

  • May 16, 2024

    BNSF Judge Vows To Avoid Extremes In Trespass Payout

    A federal judge said Thursday that BNSF Railway Co. will likely have to fork over profits from its entire 1,500-mile oil shipment route to compensate a Washington tribe for nearly a decade of train trespassings across a less-than-mile-long easement, but the judge said the disgorgement won't be the hundreds of millions the tribe is seeking.

  • May 16, 2024

    Exxon Pipeline In Dallas At Risk Over Excavation Co. Dumping

    ExxonMobil and a commercial excavation company have agreed to a temporary injunction that would prevent the company from dumping cement slabs and other debris on land over a key Exxon fuel pipeline that runs under Dallas, with a state judge on Thursday indicating she would sign off on the proposal.

  • May 16, 2024

    GM, LG Ink $150M Deal To End Chevy Bolt Battery Defect Suit

    A proposed class of Chevrolet Bolt owners asked a Michigan federal court on Thursday to give the go-ahead for a $150 million deal to end claims against General Motors LLC and LG units over alleged battery defects they say make the cars prone to overheating and fires.

  • May 16, 2024

    Nantucket Accused Of Biased Car-Rental Licensing

    A Nantucket couple has sued the island town's government in Massachusetts federal court, alleging it enforced an illegal and racially biased bylaw enacted 27 years ago to shut down their car rental business.

  • May 16, 2024

    Windels Marx Accused Of Double-Dealing In NYC Taxi Deal

    Windels Marx Lane & Mittendorf LLP was sued in Minnesota federal court Thursday over claims that, while representing both the buyer and the seller in a transaction of New York City taxi medallions, it repeatedly lied to the seller and helped the buyer evade paying $390,000 it owed.

  • May 16, 2024

    Delta, Flight Attendants Ink $16M Deal To End Wage Suit

    Delta Air Lines flight attendants reached a nearly $16 million settlement with the company in an almost decadelong suit accusing the airline of wage statement violations, they told a California federal judge, saying the "extremely favorable" deal should be approved because it would give class members close to full reimbursement.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Courts Must Stay Suits Sent To Arbitration

    The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously concluded Thursday that federal courts do not have discretion to toss a case once it's decided that the claims belong in arbitration, ruling in a wage and overtime suit brought by delivery drivers against their employer.

  • May 16, 2024

    Treasury Provides Extra Relief For Bonus Energy Tax Credits

    The U.S. Treasury Department provided additional safe harbors Thursday that clean energy project developers can use to qualify for bonus tax credits for domestically sourcing their steel and aluminum parts in response to the Biden administration's new trade restrictions on solar products from China.

  • May 15, 2024

    Iridium Partner Gets Novel FAA Waiver For Beyond-Sight Use

    In what satellite phone company Iridium Communications is calling a "watershed moment," the Federal Aviation Administration is allowing one of its partner companies to begin beyond visual line of sight operations, Iridium said Wednesday.

  • May 15, 2024

    Daimler Settles Worker's Suit Claiming Pot Test Got Him Fired

    Daimler Truck North America LLC has settled an employee's New Jersey federal court suit claiming he was illegally fired over a positive cannabis test following an accident in a company vehicle, even though he wasn't found at fault for the incident, according to a Wednesday court filing.

  • May 15, 2024

    Scott + Scott, Schall To Rep Investors Against Bike Parts Co.

    Scott + Scott Attorneys At Law LLP and the Schall Law Firm will represent a proposed class of investors in Georgia bicycle parts maker Fox Factory Holding Corp. in a suit alleging the company hurt investors by concealing slumping sales and demand.

  • May 15, 2024

    Auto Max Must Face Suit Over Transport Driver Injury

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Wednesday said a vehicle transporter's claims that he was injured because Auto Max Corp. failed to tell him that a truck he was moving was inoperable should go to a jury.

  • May 15, 2024

    Tesla Must Face Trimmed 'Full Self-Driving' False Ad Suit

    Tesla can escape warranty claims in an amended proposed class action alleging the electric automotive giant deceived drivers into falsely believing that its cars can fully pilot themselves, a California federal judge ruled Wednesday, but it must face fraud- and negligence-based claims related to representations made about the vehicles' hardware.

  • May 15, 2024

    House Panel Weighs Baltimore Bridge Rebuilding Costs

    Rebuilding Baltimore's Francis Scott Key Bridge may cost up to $1.9 billion and take at least four years, as accident investigators continue to examine how a cargo ship slammed into the bridge in March and knocked it down, officials told a House panel Wednesday.

  • May 15, 2024

    Metropolis, SP Plus Get Rare Early End To $1.5B Deal Probe

    The U.S. Department of Justice has agreed to a rare early termination of its review of payments tech company Metropolis Technologies Inc.'s planned $1.5 billion deal for parking and logistics provider SP Plus Corp., after previously requesting additional information about the transaction.

  • May 15, 2024

    Moving Coalition Urges GAO To Probe $20B DOD Moving Deal

    Over 250 moving industry members are urging the U.S. Government Accountability Office to investigate a multibillion-dollar contract having a single company manage moving services for the U.S. Department of Defense, saying the deal might not be as achievable as hoped.

Expert Analysis

  • 8 Questions To Ask Before Final CISA Breach Reporting Rule

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    The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency’s recently proposed cyber incident reporting requirements for critical infrastructure entities represent the overall approach CISA will take in its final rule, so companies should be asking key compliance questions now and preparing for a more complicated reporting regime, say Arianna Evers and Shannon Mercer at WilmerHale.

  • Justices Clarify FAA But Leave Behind Important Questions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Bissonnette v. LePage firmly shuts the door on any argument that the Federal Arbitration Act's Section 1 exemption is limited to transportation workers whose employers transport goods on behalf of others, but two major issues remain unresolved, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • Best Practices For Space Security In Our Connected World

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    NASA's recently published space security guide is another indication that cyber-resilience has become a global theme for the space and satellite sector, as well as a useful reference for companies and organizations reviewing their cybersecurity frameworks or looking to partner with the U.S. agency, says Hayley Blyth at Bird & Bird.

  • A Recipe For Growth Equity Investing In A Slow M&A Market

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    Carl Marcellino at Ropes & Gray discusses the factors bolstering appetite for growth equity fundraising in a depressed M&A market, and walks through the deal terms and other ingredients that set growth equity transactions apart from bread-and-butter venture capital investing.

  • What 100 Federal Cases Suggest About Changes To Chevron

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    With the U.S. Supreme Court poised to overturn or narrow its 40-year-old doctrine of Chevron deference, a review of 100 recent federal district court decisions confirm that changes to the Chevron framework will have broad ramifications — but the magnitude of the impact will depend on the details of the high court's ruling, say Kali Schellenberg and Jon Cochran at LeVan Stapleton.

  • Notable Q1 Updates In Insurance Class Actions

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    Mark Johnson and Mathew Drocton at BakerHostetler discuss notable insurance class action decisions from the first quarter of the year ranging from salvage vehicle titling to rate discrimination based on premium-setting software.

  • Manufacturers Should Pay Attention To 'Right-To-Repair' Laws

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    Oregon’s recently passed "right-to-repair" statute highlights that the R2R movement is not going away, and that manufacturers of all kinds need to be paying attention to the evolving list of R2R statutes in various states and consider participating in the process, says Courtney Sarnow at Culhane.

  • How Cos. Can Comply With New PFAS Superfund Rule

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's new rule designating two per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances as "hazardous substances" under the Superfund law will likely trigger additional enforcement and litigation at sites across the country — so companies should evaluate any associated reporting obligations and liability risks, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • Ill. Justices' Ruling Answers Corporate Defamation Questions

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    The Illinois Supreme Court's recent unanimous decision in Project44 v. FourKites provides needed certainty and direction for lower courts considering defamation cases involving communications to corporate officers from third parties outside the corporation, which could result in fewer unwarranted motions to dismiss in trial courts and nonmeritorious appeals, says Phillip Zisook at Schoenberg Finkel.

  • As Arbitrator Bias Claims Rise, Disclosure Standards Evolve

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    The growth in post-award challenges based on arbitrators' alleged conflicts of interest has led to the release of new guidance and new case law on the topic — both supporting the view that professional familiarity alone does not translate to a lack of impartiality, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Don't Use The Same Template For Every Client Alert

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    As the old marketing adage goes, consistency is key, but law firm style guides need consistency that contemplates variety when it comes to client alert formats, allowing attorneys to tailor alerts to best fit the audience and subject matter, says Jessica Kaplan at Legally Penned.

  • Series

    Walking With My Dog Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Thanks to my dog Birdie, I've learned that carving out an activity different from the practice of law — like daily outdoor walks that allow you to interact with new people — can contribute to professional success by boosting creativity and mental acuity, as well as expanding your social network, says Sarah Petrie at the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

  • Could 'General Average' Apply To The Key Bridge Crash?

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    While the owner and operator of the vessel that struck Baltimore's Francis Scott Key Bridge have sought legal protection under the Limitation of Liability Act, they could choose to invoke the long-standing principle of general average, if supported by the facts of the crash and the terms of their contracts with cargo owners, says Julie Maurer at Husch Blackwell.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Follow The Iron Rule Of Trial Logic

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    Many diligent and eager attorneys include every good fact, point and rule in their trial narratives — spurred by the gnawing fear they’ll be second-guessed for leaving something out — but this approach ignores a fundamental principle of successful trial lawyering, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

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