Transportation

  • May 06, 2024

    5th Circ. Revives Airline Workers' Hearing-Loss Suit

    A pair of flight attendants seeking to hold Boeing liable over hearing loss they suffered due to an aircraft's allegedly faulty smoke alarm have successfully convinced a Fifth Circuit panel to allow them to refile their case, bringing their claims back from the brink almost three years after the appeals court tossed them.

  • May 06, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs Ford In Black Ex-Plumber's Bias Suit

    The Seventh Circuit on Monday upheld Ford Motor Co.'s defeat of a former plumber's lawsuit alleging she was punished for reporting she'd been treated harshly by her supervisor because she's a Black Muslim woman, finding nothing wrong with a lower court tossing the case.

  • May 06, 2024

    Class Actions Target Conn. Dealership Prices For 'VIN Etching'

    Three proposed class actions seeking to represent thousands of automobile buyers have accused Connecticut dealerships of overcharging for a service called VIN etching, which is designed to make it harder for thieves to offload stolen vehicles.

  • May 06, 2024

    Rocker Tommy Lee Nixes Helicopter Sex Assault Suit, For Now

    A California judge on Monday dismissed a lawsuit accusing musician Tommy Lee of groping a woman in 2003, finding the claims cannot be carried under a statute that opened a lookback window for sexual assault claims that may otherwise be time-barred, but granted leave to amend the complaint.

  • May 06, 2024

    Navy Says Shipbuilder Premature On $150M Bad Faith Suit

    The U.S. Navy has urged the Court of Federal Claims to toss a $150 million suit alleging the Navy deliberately thwarted a shipbuilder's efforts to build a fleet of landing craft, saying the company failed to follow the proper procedure before suing.

  • May 06, 2024

    Mass. Justices Wary Of Spiking Uber, Lyft Ballot Questions

    Justices on Massachusetts' highest court appeared unlikely Monday to strike down ballot proposals to reinvent app-based drivers' relationships with Uber, Lyft and the like, commenting that the scattershot ideas for voters in March all carry the underlying theme of creating a carveout from the state's worker-friendly employee classification law.

  • May 06, 2024

    Judge Backs H-2B Visa Rejection For Missing Trucking Routes

    A U.S. Department of Labor official was not wrong to reject a trucking company's application to hire foreign long-haul truckers because the company failed to provide detailed routes for the drivers, an agency judge said.

  • May 06, 2024

    EPA Finalizes Methane Reporting Regs For Oil And Gas Cos.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday finalized revisions of its Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program regulations for the oil and gas sector, the latest step taken by the Biden administration to clamp down on methane emissions from the industry.

  • May 06, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A record $100 million settlement, a fishy Facebook decision, a canceled Amazon delivery and an upended $7.3 billion sale dispute topped the news out of Delaware's Court of Chancery last week. There were also new cases involving Hess, Microsoft and the 2022 World Cup.

  • May 06, 2024

    Auto Parts Co. Strikes Deal To End Suit Over $1.6B 401(k) Plan

    Auto parts supplier Magna International agreed to settle a class action covering about 20,000 workers who claimed to have lost millions in retirement savings because the company failed to cut underperforming and costly investments from their $1.6 billion retirement plan.

  • May 03, 2024

    Gilstrap Scraps $6.6M Tire Pressure IP Verdict Against Autel

    A federal judge in Texas has granted Autel's post-trial motion for judgment as a matter of law that it does not infringe an Orange Electronic Co. Ltd. tire pressure monitoring patent, wiping out a $6.6 million jury verdict from June.

  • May 03, 2024

    Panama Builder Seeks TRO In Del. After Port Case Remand

    Victims of an alleged "brazen and intricate" international scheme to steal an entire $1.4 billion Panama Canal port project by way of sham Delaware companies and claims urged a Delaware vice chancellor on Friday to convene a temporary restraining order hearing next week to sidetrack the effort.

  • May 03, 2024

    Mich. Justices Punt On Privacy Questions In Drone Dispute

    The Michigan Supreme Court on Friday dodged a novel question about the constitutionality of a town's drone surveillance of a couple's property, ruling that photos taken by the drone could not be suppressed in a zoning proceeding.

  • May 03, 2024

    Nikola Ends Board Takeover Suit As Ex-CEO's Noms Withdraw

    An Arizona federal judge on Thursday agreed to toss Nikola Corp.'s complaint against its former CEO and convicted felon Trevor Milton and several others accusing them of an illegal board takeover by pushing unqualified candidates, after the defendants withdrew their board nominees and the parties amicably resolved the dispute.

  • May 03, 2024

    Ex-Spirit Flight Attendant Drops FMLA Suit

    A Florida federal judge on Friday dismissed a lawsuit a former flight attendant lodged against Spirit Airlines accusing it of firing her after she complained that its medical leave policies ran afoul of the Family and Medical Leave Act.

  • May 03, 2024

    Honolulu Asks Justices To Affirm State Court Climate Case

    Honolulu on Wednesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reject fossil fuel companies' bid to put an end to its lawsuit alleging they knew for decades about the negative impacts of their products on climate change but concealed the information.

  • May 03, 2024

    DC Circ. Backs Feds' Puerto Rico Port Expansion Project

    The D.C. Circuit on Friday upheld the federal government's plans to broaden shipping lanes at Puerto Rico's largest port, rejecting arguments from a trio of environmental groups who accused the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers of failing to take the requisite hard look at the dredging project's environmental risks.

  • May 03, 2024

    Arbitration Exemption Doesn't Cover Cos., Conn. Judge Rules

    Two food distributors who created corporate entities while working for a food service business must arbitrate claims they were misclassified as independent contractors because a Federal Arbitration Act carveout doesn't apply to businesses, a Connecticut federal judge has ruled.

  • May 03, 2024

    Sens. Look To Add Kids Online Bills To FAA Bill

    A bipartisan group of senators is looking to add legislation to better protect kids online and on social media to the Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act, which faces a May 10 deadline for enactment.

  • May 03, 2024

    Robbins Geller Attys To Take Stand In $8M Sanctions Dispute

    A petroleum refiner will put current and former Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP attorneys on the stand May 7 in an extraordinary evidentiary hearing testing what the plaintiffs' lawyers knew about an analyst's now-discredited findings as they pursued since-nixed price-fixing claims.

  • May 03, 2024

    Ohio Atty Gets 3rd Suspension After Not Reporting Conviction

    A Cleveland-area attorney trying to get reinstated after neglecting bankruptcy cases was suspended yet again by the Ohio Supreme Court, which said he failed to report a drug conviction to his county bar association for almost eight months.

  • May 03, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen rapper Ivorian Doll hit with a copyright claim, private members club Aspinalls file a claim against a Saudi sheikh, and Motorola Solutions file a claim against the British government on the heels of its dispute over losing a £400 million ($502 million) government contract. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • May 03, 2024

    Car Loan Co. Strikes Deal In Employee Stock Valuation Suit

    A car loan company has agreed to resolve a proposed class action alleging it violated federal benefits law when it revalued its stock at the start of the pandemic and forced retirees to sell their shares at a lower value, according to a California federal court filing.

  • May 03, 2024

    Final EV Tax Credit Regs Add New Battery Tracing Test

    The U.S. Treasury Department unveiled final regulations Friday for the up to $7,500 electric vehicle tax credit that include a more detailed process for automakers to trace the battery supply chain to qualify for the credit's domestic content requirements.

  • May 02, 2024

    Boeing Supplier Sues Texas AG To Block Safety Investigation

    The subsidiary of a company that produces fuselages for Boeing's 737 jets sued on Wednesday to block the Texas attorney general's investigation into apparent manufacturing issues that have caused recent midair emergencies, saying the probe is unconstitutional and violates the company's right to be free from unreasonable searches.

Expert Analysis

  • Unpacking The New Russia Sanctions And Export Controls

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    Although geographically broad new prohibitions the U.S., U.K. and EU issued last week are somewhat underwhelming in their efforts to target third-country facilitators of Russia sanctions evasion, companies with exposure to noncompliant jurisdictions should pay close attention to their potential impacts, say attorneys at Shearman.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

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    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • A Rare Look At Judicial Interpretation Of LEG Exclusions

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    A Florida federal court’s order last month in Archer Western-De Moya v. Ace American Insurance and an earlier decision from a D.C. federal court offer insight into how courts may interpret defects exclusion clauses developed by the London Engineering Group — filling a void in case law in the area, says Jonathan Bruce at Holman Fenwick.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • What Recent Setbacks In Court Mean For Enviro Justice

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    Two courts in Louisiana last month limited the federal government's ability to require consideration of Civil Rights Act disparate impacts when evaluating state-issued permits — likely providing a framework for opposition to environmental justice initiatives in other states, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Gulf Cooperation Council

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    The Gulf Cooperation Council is in the early stages of ESG policy implementation, but recent commitments by both states and corporations — including increases in sustainable finance transactions, environmental commitments, female representation on boards and human rights enforcement — show continuing progress toward broader ESG goals, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Steps For Companies New To Sanctions Compliance

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    Businesses newly required to implement compliance programs due to the increased breadth of mandatory sanctions and export controls, including 500 additional Russia sanctions announced last Friday, should closely follow the guidance issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control and other regulators, say Jennifer Schubert and Megan Church at MoloLamken.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Justices Stay The Course In Maritime Choice-Of-Law Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's narrowly drawn decision in Great Lakes Insurance v. Raiders Retreat Realty, enforcing the underlying insurance contract's choice-of-law provision, carefully distinguishes those provisions from forum selection clauses, and ensures that courts will not apply its precepts outside the maritime context, says John Coyle at the University of North Carolina.

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Challenges Remain In Financing Energy Transition Minerals

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    COP28, the latest U.N. climate conference, reached a consensus on a just and equitable transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy, but more action and funding will be needed to ensure that developed countries responsibly source the minerals that will be critical for this process, say attorneys at Watson Farley.

  • Del. Segway Dismissal Suggests Execs Not Liable For Biz Risk

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    While the debate continues within the Delaware Chancery Court over whether Caremark liability applies to matters of pure business risk, the court's recent rejection of Segway’s suit against the ex-president who oversaw financial difficulties suggests the court is uninterested in undermining the deference the business judgment rule grants corporate fiduciaries, say attorneys at Dechert.

  • Aviation Watch: 737 Max Blowout Raises Major Safety Issues

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    The sudden in-flight loss of a side panel on an Alaska Air 737-9 Max last month, leaving a gaping hole in the side of the plane's cabin, highlighted ongoing quality issues at Boeing, the jet's manufacturer — but the failure also arose from decisions made by the airline, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

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